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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys, I have a GT350 setup (from a 67) in my 65. I have a local shop that will be doing the Sniper efi conversion this spring. I'll be going with the Holley replacement tank kit as well, replacing all the fuel lines (true non return).

After the install is completed does it really more or less turn the car into a daily driver? No more stalling issues / hot weather issues ect?

Please let me know if there are any other concerns I should be aware of. Thanks.
 

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It certainly makes mine much more of a pleasure to drive. I put 10k on it last summer alone. Sounds like you've got it figured out.

You will need a return line. Also, make sure they follow the wiring instructions explicitly. The Snipers seem to be fairly sensitive to interference and don't like anything but the power and ground right off the battery. I've also seen countless people fumble by not using a switch power source for the unit that provides power in Run AND start!

I'd also suggest having a bung welded into the exhaust or headers for the Oxy sensor!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks a lot. Yeah, all those things mentioned are covered. My local guy only specializes in classics and is pretty much the best of the best where I am. He's done dozens of them.

I just wanted to get happy face confirmation on the decision :)
 

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I have the MSD Atomic, but very similar in nature to the Sniper. Your experience will depend on if the shop is going to do any tuning prior to turning it over to you. I had to adjust the throttle blades, squirt, and PV settings because i had a stumble when accelerating. Also, not sure if you are having it control timing, but that would be something else to play with. It did start much easier and run less fat than before though, but that was mostly attributed to a carb that was not tuned correctly.
 

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I went with the aeromotive stealth tank gen ii, which i highly recommend. It is the only tank that I'm aware of that has the fuel lines in the original fuel sender location. This means no fuel lines running through your trunk, if you care. I care.
 

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I installed my own and have just started driving it. Starts great but I need to work out a stalling issuing when I rev high and return to idle. Just getting into it so I'll get it figured out. You do not have to have a return line. I used the Holley OEM fit fuel pump module which does not require a return line. So far so good but I only have 30 miles on this thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies guys. I really appreciate it.
 

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Like @cavboy78, I also installed an MSD Atomic (similar) and have truly loved the experience of switching from carb. Has made all the difference in the world. One of the best upgrades you can do in my opinion. As others mention, you can fine tune/tweak from the control unit to adjust any major issues as you get started, but they generally learn from that point forward as well. Enjoy!
 

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Would one recommend using one of the EFI kits on a 500hp 418 stroker driven on the street? I'm up in the air between a carb and one of the conversion kits out there.
 

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@RTM There are better experts out there than me and you may get more detailed analysis, but depending on your intended use (if its street-driven, regular driver, desire better reliability/performance, etc), I would say absolutely do the EFI and do it without hesitation.
 

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Another advantage to a return line is that fuel does not sit in the line heating up as much. I put a return line on my carb and it made a world of difference. I also have an AFR gauge, so I can see how the mixture is doing. If you can, I would install the system with a return line because of controlling heat if nothing else.
 

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If you replace the fuel and ignition systems with new original style parts and get rid of all the 50 year old parts your car will run great. But by that point you’re almost or as much into it than adding modern systems and after a while you’ll need to maintain it anyway. Eventually the original style mechanical parts will need some old school mechanical lovin’. For under a couple grand you can do a lot to improve your enjoyment of your car by adding a Sniper.
 

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Installations is the easiest part of Sniper install. Tuning is the part that takes time, knowledge and experience especially getting it to run right in cold weather and with cold engine. Been daily driving and tuning a 69 with Sniper about 4 months, still couldn't get it to not stall in certain conditions with cold engine. Did not notice any mpg improvements, but mostly driving it in town. If your installer is going to tune it, make sure he tunes it in cold weather also if you will be driving in cold weather.
 

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After the [Sniper] install is completed does it really more or less turn the car into a daily driver? No more stalling issues / hot weather issues ect?
I'd wager there is something else going on. These cars, including the Shelby GT350, were built and sold as reliable daily drivers, and they were very reliable. If you have stalling and hot weather problems, there is something wrong with the car, and it's not the OEM engine configuration.

I think what I'm getting at is there is very likely a way to solve your problem that involves far less expense than replacing the entire fuel system.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well ..... I see your points, but it's hard to compare the world of 1965 (the year I was born) to 2020. Climate / replacement parts / FUEL (with ethanol), 1 million times the street lights / more distance being traveled and traffic in general just not what is was in 1965.

My car honestly isn't bad at all, so me me it's more along the lines of making it a bit more modern, and allowing air/fuel to be where it should be all the time. The bonus is better all around driving conditions in 2020 as apposed to 1965.
 

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Would one recommend using one of the EFI kits on a 500hp 418 stroker driven on the street? I'm up in the air between a carb and one of the conversion kits out there.
Yes....
I’ve got a 500hp stroker cleveland with a Holley Super Sniper.
The car loves it.
Highly recommend.
Do it and never look back.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I figured I'd weigh in since I have a carb'd and a Sniper'd mustang. Bear in mind these are two completely different animals but there are aspects of the Sniper that have me convinced that the carb'd car is going to get a Sniper at some point in the future.

I'm no stranger to tuning carbs and the mustang with it runs pretty dang great. The engine is a mild 289/302...probably in the 320hp range. It starts and runs great...when the temperature is above 50 degrees or so which is about the only time I drive it anyway. It used to have heat soak issues that were solved with a spacer. The throttle response is great and, as a cruiser, it does the job nicely. The ignition system is more or less stock and I've maintained the car pretty well. For the most part, the car is a get in, turn key, start, massage a little, go drive, and have fun machine. Aside from occasionally being a little on the cold blooded side, my only mild complaint is that slight gas smell you get in the garage from the carb. The carb is an Eddy 1405 that I've tuned using a wideband.

Then there's the Sniper'd mustang...It's been designed and built to be a pro-touring type daily driver. The engine is a 408 that's somewhere in the neighborhood of 600-650 flywheel hp depending on the tune (courtesy of the Sniper). I was concerned about the reliability of an EFI system being that this is a daily driver but, aside from a few self inflicted issues, it's been flawless. I do not trust Holley pressure regulators (long story) so I dead headed the Sniper's regulator for an Aeromotive regulator. Aside from making all the lines (i did Fragola braided lines for both send and return since I chucked the old fuel line) the install was really easy in the grand scheme of all the other crap i've done to this car.

The things that have me convinced that I'll put a Sniper in the other car:
  • never worry about heat soak
  • no massaging...turn key, drive snot out of car...and i'm not nice to this car at all
  • throttle response is........intense
  • tuning capability is amazing - I tune the fuel maps and ignition tables myself with a laptop but I'd have no complaints using the general handheld tuning capabilities
  • ignition timing control as well as electric fan control if you have them (I do and recommend the timing control)
The things that kind of annoy me about it and EFI in general:
  • when you're out of gas...you're done. While a carb you can put around in 'lean mode' since there will be some slosh in the bowls
  • wiring is a little unsightly unless you take a little extra care to hide it (if you're in to that sort of thing). See my thread on how i mitigated that
  • timing control requires upgrading your ignition system which add expense to an already expensive system but, depending on your goals it's probably worth it...at least i think so
Overall, I'm incredibly happy with it. Now that I have my tunes (street, strip, road course / autocross) and the other minor things sorted i just get in and drive. BTW, I put about 500 miles on the carb'd car and > 3500 on the Sniper'd car last year. I'm expecting to get at least 5k on the Sniper this year.

Lastly, if you go with a Sniper or have one already, I'd recommend getting a different secondary linkage...preferably an adjustable one. The way the Sniper is setup, all 4 venturi's open together which can make getting started from a stop without barking the tires a challenge as well as increases the gas pedal feel. The adjustable secondary linkage lets you set it up as a mechanical secondary.
 

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Well ..... I see your points, but it's hard to compare the world of 1965 (the year I was born) to 2020. Climate / replacement parts / FUEL (with ethanol), 1 million times the street lights / more distance being traveled and traffic in general just not what is was in 1965.

My car honestly isn't bad at all, so me me it's more along the lines of making it a bit more modern, and allowing air/fuel to be where it should be all the time. The bonus is better all around driving conditions in 2020 as apposed to 1965.
Hmmm… Not sure why a car that ran great in 1966 (my favorite year Mustang) would run lousy now. Just a few years after 1966, I regularly ran my car to the shore on the Garden State Parkway. If you are unfamiliar with the GSP, that road, at least back in the day, often turned into a parking lot, as it did when I first had the car on a day that was 97°. My A code 289 did not overheat or stall. And when moving, that car got 21 mpg. So I'll compare driving conditions with anyone.

Ethanol (may it please go away) should have little effect, and I'm confused by how streetlights or global warming could effect engine operation.
 
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