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Today I had to remove the oilpan because I used a to small block of wood between the jack and the oilpan. You can guess what happened !! After removing the pan I checked the timing chain and noticed quite a bit of slack.
I know this chain and sprockets have done 45000 Miles and that they are replaced in 1988. Is it wise to replace the chain and sprockets after this 45K mls ? The engine is running fine .

Erwin, The Netherlands,

Visit my homepage at : http://home.hccnet.nl/e.pilage/index.htm<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by 66candy on 03/13/01 04:05 PM (server time).</FONT></P>
 
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as long as your down there, why not? it'll cost you $30(us) and save you having to do it anytime soon.


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I figure in 10 years or 100 thousand miles they need to be replaced. If you change
your oil often maybe longer. Change it and replace the belts and waterpump. That
should set you up for another ten years

M.C.A.# 50000
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You should get much much more out of the chain and sprocket. With clean oil etc they should last the life of the other components and be replaced when the engine needs a total overhaul. If you have stripped the timing cover etc then you might as well replace them as they don't cost that much.
 

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Depends on what's in there...a good quality all-metal link chain or double roller set should last the normal lifetime of a rebuilt engine, which is typically 100-120K with good maintenance...

All chains will stretch a bit but this has only a minor effect on cam and ignition timing....if you put a timing light on the engine and bring the rpm up slowly, you should see a steady movement of the strobe on the timing marks as the timing advances...if it jerks around, then the timing set (or possibly the distributor advance mechanism) is in need of repair or replacement.

If you put a straightedge across the sprockets and depress the chain with a scale, how much deflection do you have with as much effort as you can muster? I've seen some new sets that deflect 1/8"-1/4" in the middle of the chain....

Good luck!

Pat
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