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Hi gang!

Ever get something on your car's painted surface and don't really know how to deal with it or what to use to fix it? Maybe even a small scratch!

I thought I'd give you a few SHOW CAR tips on ultra fine detailing.

Let's say for example that somehow your car gets some "overspray" on it.
Meaning some very small droplets of paint carried through the air onto your beautiful paint job. This also works for about any kind of blemish or whatever you might need to fix or repair on your painted surfaces.

Go to an automtive paint store and buy a bottle of 3M #051131-05933 PERFECT III Rubbing Compound. It is a liquid, in a Black plastic 32 oz./1 Quart bottle. While you're there get a couple sheets of 1500 wet and dry sandpaper.

Do not try this with ANYTHING else!

For little blemishes and light overspray or whatever else, simply apply some rubbing compound to a soft dry terry cloth towel and run until the area is clean and back to perfect. It's just that simple. Be patient, this is a VERY MILD soft cutting liquid compound meant for the final finish. NOTE: It will NOT remove the clear-coat on later model cars.

You can also use this to repair a scratch or for correctly repairing a "spot fill" for a rock chip with the correct color touch-up paint.

First clean the area to be repaired with the 3M rubbing compound. Then fill the rock chip with new paint. I normally use an old ball point pin that no longer works or even a tooth pick for very small rock chips or for filling a longer thin scratch.

Let the new paint dry for a day, then put some "spit/saliva" on the area and sand it carefully with the 1500 wet and dry sandpaper. Sand only the excess paint off if possible and do not scratch up more area than necessary to flatten and blend the new paint into the repaired hole/scratch. If it takes more than one application to fill the hole, then do it. Patience is the key to success. Most people try to do this kind of repair too quickly and simply mess up the repair. Time is your friend. Let the paint dry and harden first.

Sand the area smooth. Then with the 3M rubbing compound restore the shine. Again be patient and rub like hell. Keep it moist with either saliva or water so the sandpaper pores won't clog up too quickly. I normally use a very small piece of sandpaper about 2" square for this type of repair.

Once it's repaired and back to normal again, then use some wax like Meguire's Tech Wax to finish it and protect it again and add that nice car show shine.

I hope this helps you someday.

Your car nut friend,
"Doc"
http://jmichael.info/shelbytrophyshots2.jpg
 

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I use a similar method for repairing chips/scratches except I use an old style drafting pen for applying the paint and wait a few days before rubbing with a Meguiar's Unigrit Sanding Block K-3000. Works everytime. As you say patience is key.
 

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Mother's makes a pretty decent detailing kit, that comes with a small clay bar. You spray on the "Showtime" wax to lubricate the clay bar, and then rub the offending panel. May not work on heavy fallout, but may be worth a try before going the wet sand & buff route. If you do go that route the 3-M compund mentioned in prior post is the best I have found.
 
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