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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am finally fetting my 65 back from the body shop and all tht is left to do is the front seat covers.
Is this something that a DIY'er can do? What tools are needed besides a hog ring plier? The covers are from NPD and I am only doing the front buckets. They are in great shape but just showing a little wear on the seams. The foam seems solid and firm.Any tips and advice are appreciated.
I CAN'T WAIT TO GET THE OL' GIRL ON THE ROAD AGAIN WITH HER NEW PAINT!!!!!
 

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Yes a DYI'er can do it. Be damn careful you don't hog ring your fingers!

I think one of the biggest issues is making sure the seat cover is kept straight on the bun/seat frame. Nothing looks worse than covers that are crooked after installation.

Once you have the center lasts ringed to the seat frame, the next issue is getting the cover over the seat buns, especially the corners. You'll swear it can't be done without tearing the stiching, but it can. Go slowly. Sometimes a hair dryer helps to soften the vinyl a bit allowing it to stretch. Don't get the dryer to close or you may damage the vinyl.

Good luck.
 

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Put the seat covers out in the sun for awhile before you start the installation. The covers will be much easier to do when warm and pliable.
 

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Yes, a DIY'er can do this. Some tips:

1. Pay close attention to how the old covers are installed when you take them off

2. Be sure to hang onto the wire pieces that run through the seams in the old upholstry, you'll need to stick them in the new

3. Heat up the upholstry first; sun, furnace, hairdryer, whatever

4. Buy more hog rings than you think you'll need

5. You'll need to cut a couple holes in the new upholstry for hinges and screws to go through. Do not cut these holes, rather melt them through with a soldering iron. The melted hole edges are much stronger than cut edges

Good luck! This is one of those Stang resto jobs that feels so good, because people will compliment you on your terrific upholstry job without realizing how easy it is to do!
 

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I found that turning the seat cover inside out then setting them on top of the seat cushion before trying to hook the center wires to the frame will enable you to more easily center them (and you can see what you're doing better. Also, you need to cut through the cusion with a knife or scissor to attach the wires (leave them attached at the ends- I just cut little slots where I knew the hog rings would go). Push down fromthe top and up from the bottom. If you have a buddy available, who you trust with hogrings that close to your hands, it's easier to have someone else ring it while you hold everything togeter, but this can be done alone.

Get more hog rings than you could ever possibily use. Running out of rings while you have a good head of steam stinks.

Start with the seat backs, as they are easier than the seat bottoms.

I also found that working the material teeney bit by teeney bit from the inside of the cushion to the outside will eventually get you enough material to reach the frame and hog ring it.

It's not that bad a job, but my hands hurt (cramping and sore) for a few days.
 

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Someone mentioned on here before that they put a plastic bag over the foam pads before they started. This let the covers just slide right on....Just don't remember if he left the plastic bag in the seat or not....Sounds like a good Idea to me...I did my Mach 1 (tall back) seats, and could have used this idea......
 

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I'm currently in the process of doing the 66. One suggestion made in another post was to take a clothes hanger, and make a small fish hook on one end. Once you put the foam on the frame, and turn the seat cover inside out, and on top of the foam, then use the coat hanger to stab through the foam and grab the listing wire in the middle that is attached to the frame, and pull it tight against the wire that is in the upholstery, then hog ring it. I found this much easier than any other way, and I've tried a few over the last week.
 

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I saw on Hot Rod TV or Crank & Chrome where they sprayed the inside of the cover with a little Silicone lubricant to help it slide on. Hav'nt tried it myself.

John
 

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Only thing that was not mentioned in the posts was to get a Good set of hogring pliers, the ones that come with the kits are just about useless.I think I got about 4 hogrings done when they fell apart. I use the straight ones as well as the 45 degree. I find the angle ones nice for doing the listing wires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks to all of you for all the GREAT tips!!!Now if you guys would just stop by and have a few brews you could give a little hands on demo.....
 
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