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OK I'm reaching that point where I sand blast and paint the front end suspentsion should i take it all out and have it powdercoated if so what can I expect to spend? I want a paint that will last can I paint it my self with a durable coating???? I would like a cost effective option.

thanks

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I plan on powder coating my front end . Im going to buy a el-cheapo gun from Harbor Freight Tools and a old half broken stove and do my own stuff . I figure Im going to drive mine alot and nothing will keep the parts clean and good looking other than powder coating . Regular paint chips and obviously under the car is going to get hit if the car is driven .
I guess it's personal choice , many parts from the factory were not painted .
 

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Based on the experiences of several friends, powdercoating will chip and scratch, too. I would put on a good primer followed by a couple of layers of good paint, such as Eastwood's Chassis Black or Detail Gray, and then a couple coats of Krylon Satin Clear for protection (don't use Eastwood's Diamond Clear). It's cheaper than powdercoating and a lot easier to fix if damage occurs.
 

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i agree with laurie. mike clean it good prime it with a enamel primer and coat it a couple of times with your color of chose
chris
ps mike you don't call, write or e-mail
whats up
 

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I also agree with Laurie. Paint can be touched up when it chips. You can't do that with powder coating. Also, if powder coating gets water/moisture under it (and it will if it gets chipped), the underlying metal will rust and you may never even notice until it's too late. Powder coating is great for show cars, but it isn't something I'd want under any car I actually drive.

Gary
 

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Of my personal experience with powder .... Ive got friends who use it on the off-road racing motorcycle/4 wheelers because paint comes off to easy . I have another who had his casting platform for his boat done with white powder . His platform was stood on by multiple people with shoes on, hit with fishing poles / lures / sinkers/ whatever fishing gear we could and explosed to salt water on a weekly basis . No corrosion , no scratched off areas and no chips . He bought a new boat that is green (old was white) and decided to paint the platform grey to match the deck and floor of his new green boat . The paint would not stick , peeled right off to reveal a perfect powder coat . He then tried to remove the powder coat with a couple different paint strippers and none of them would even think of lifting the coating . He finally gave up and installed it white because he didnt want to mess with it anymore .
In my experience powder coat is some tuff stuff .... Id be more than happy to rub off overspray , road grime , paint thats been shot up from the road , or a long list of other junk from the coated components . Of course it will chip as it would be hard to get anything to not chip if you hit it hard enough but from what Ive seen of it the chipping will be less than what you get from normal paint ... that will after a while just get sandblasted off from driving .
 

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If the surface is prepared properly, and the powder applied and cured properly, it will outlast paint from every angle. If the powder is not applied properly, then it can chip, and allow moisture to get in and rust. If you PC gloss black and do get a chip, black touchup paint works. If you are going to paint, take the time to use prefessional chemicals, not rattle can. Rattle can always fades. I did my engine compartment in Gloss Black Enamel 7 years ago, and it still looks this good (when cleaned)

http://pages.prodigy.net/al.martin/myengine1.jpg

Al
 

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I powder coated my wheels on my flatfender jeep about 3 yrs. ago and they have still withstood the nieghbor's dog hiking it's leg on them about 3 times a week. For my money you can't beat it. Just wish I had a oven (heat source) big enough to put my engine compartment in. :p
 

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Same as with properly doing the powdercoating, if care and proper preparation is done with spray cans (and a good quality paint is used), there won't be a fading problem. I've never had a problem with color fading on parts, including a number of items painted on my coupe almost 10 years ago. By applying a satin coat over the color, the paint is sealed and protected from fading. I do agree that nonrattle can paint will get you the best results in the engine compartment. But as for suspension parts and others, there is nothing wrong with using a good spray can paint.
 

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Not often I disagree w/ Laurie ::

Powder coat - NO QUESTION. At work we use both wet applied and powder coat. Powder is hands down tougher.

As for not being able to touch up. PPFFFTT. Look at the pic below. All the blue is powder coated EXCEPT the calipers. I had a quart of match enamel made up. It is almost perfect.
 

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If you're going to use a rattle can, use Rustoleum Satin Black (#7777). It's very durable and a perfect color match.
 

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I also hate to disagree w/ Laurie, but I podercoated everything that would fit in the oven, before re-assemblying my 64 1/2. I'd do the whole car, if I could! The secret is proper prep work. I sandblast everything and then use brake cleaner to get any grease off. I coated all the brackets, pulleys, trans tailshaft, oil pan (it stuck out of the oven and needed to be turned to completely finish it!), intake, etc. I have the Eastwood kit and colors. I also have the heat lamp, but haven't used it yet. It's been over a year and everything rinses clean, and the car is a daily driver. When I get time, I'll do the spindles, rotor hubs, calipers (after taking them apart), driveshaft, drums, rear end on the next car, etc. I also found that a light sanding and they can be re-shot and heated to repair any problems. I had to do this on a set of valve covers and they look new. I'm looking to resto a 68 conv and I'll do the entire engine comp in semi-gloss and bake it with the lamp. Their new cast grey looks like Eastwoods rattle paint, and their chrome almost looks like it's plated. I was playing around with 5.0 valve covers and coated over the chrome with transparant magenta and they look really awesome!
Try spraying your carb w/ carb cleaner over a painted intake!! ::
 

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It depends on who you have powder coat the items....

I got all of my bracketry, crossmebers, mounts, control arms, strutrods,
battery mount, steering assembly etc....all powder coated and it looks marvelous, is more durable than paint, and will cost about the same.

my two cents
 
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