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Build those walls !!! Hmmmmm, that may come across as political.....build that foundation!!! Gonna be a super foundation, best ever, something the likes of Michigan and the world have never seen, and the other contractors gonna pay for it...wait, still sounds too political,..how bout, ...winter is coming..... :)
 

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Looking at your fence line and proximity of your neighbors, how do you get to that garage?
First, looks like real quality work.
Second, I’m jealous. Here in Chesapeake Bay country we'd never get to build that garage on your size lot as it creates too much impervious area. Run-off is the number one problem for the water shed.
 

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Discussion Starter #805
Looking at your fence line and proximity of your neighbors, how do you get to that garage?
It looks closer than it is. The fence corner is just under 14 feet from the back corner of the house. It is a little tight. This is also why I am going with one large door. So you can more easily get around the corner and into the left side of the garage.
As soon as I can. I will be putting in a 4 post lift on the right side of the garage. The 66 Ranchero will be stored above my Mustang creating even more room for activities.

Thanks for all the positive support everyone. It means a lot.
I get stress from everywhere, and everyone, about this garage build. It will be great to get this in the rear view mirror.
 

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Discussion Starter #806
It is supposed to rain the next few days again.
So I will probably end up with a really big swimming pool. It won't hurt anything.
Maybe I should advertise for a mud spa. I could charge $50.00 ahead for old women to swim in Pure Michigan clay and mud. LOL.
Today 2 masons showed up. They got everything ready for grouting the block, tar, and back fill. Another inspection has to happen. Then after the plumbers do their work the pad can be poured. Then part of the driveway.
Here are pic's of what it looks like now. More progress is a good thing.
I forgot to mention. One of the masons that worked yesterday is also building a new, multi million dollar, Ford Museum some where local. I thought that was ironic.






 

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That looks very good!!

So they have a bit long enough to hammer drill through the holes in the block to the foundation that is 6 block high? Do they just put epoxy on the end of the rebar when it goes in the drilled hole?

You have to be talented to ring a hole with rebar 6 block down...

Even more interested now in this process...

Allen
 

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Discussion Starter #809 (Edited)
They already did the rebar see the prior pic's. The blocks with an X marked on them are to indicate where the rebar is for the inspector.
It is code that every 3rd block, or 4 feet, get rebar. Up to 3 course high, or more. Then inspected. Then it gets grouted in, and more rebar installed where needed for more courses.
Then. Back fill and more inspection.
After that Plumbing for the sewer, water, and gas. Then Plumbing inspection. Then the pad will be poured 6 inches with steel mesh reinforcement. Like the picture above.
I do not know about the L block.
He wanted to start 6 inch block for the next 3 course of block to get a lip around the perimeter of the slab.
Because this block is currently above the finish floor height, by a few inches. I do not exactly know how he intends to do the slab.
This is a conversation I will have with him the moment I see him.
Technically speaking. He can go 2 feet above the lot's front curb to meet city code. This is the code for the grade of the yard.
BUT.
I was given special instruction for this to be less. To be at 1.5 feet grade. Because I have house basement window sills to contend with. If the garage finished floor height is too high, the future new drive way grade would be too high, and end up being over the house's basement window sills.
This is a concern for me.
It is no big deal if the slab floor is floating.
 

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I'm sure you have addressed the entrance, but, how the heck ya getting in that thing with a car. Looks VERY tight all round the perimeter...
 

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I'm sure you have addressed the entrance, but, how the heck ya getting in that thing with a car. Looks VERY tight all round the perimeter...
Got a plot plan you can share so we can see the overall layout? It would clear up questions about getting in and out.
 

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Discussion Starter #814 (Edited)
Let's see if this works.
The orange is the house and old garage area. The new garage in the yellow and orange. It is 1 foot further away from the easements for my roof overhang. The new garage is 26 feet deep and 24 feet wide. So that gives me almost around 20 feet from the house to the garage. I plan on paving most of the area between the house and garage. Leaving a few feet next to the house for planting flower beds. Some of the area on the front left side will be used for a patio area.
 

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Discussion Starter #815
To recap. A little bit of back story for all of you.
About 8-10 years ago. My wife and I watched as the bubble burst and the real estate market collapsed hard in our area. Even destroying the value of our home at the time.
At this same point in time. My mother was living in a nice trailer park in what was once a nice trailer about 8 miles away from us.
The trailer was starting to fall into disrepair, and needed frequent maintenance. The Trailer park was also raising lot payments every year. I was spending a lot of my money and time trying to repair that trailer.
My mother is retired due to illness, and on a fixed income. She spent any money she ever earned, or had raising 3 sons alone with no help. I am the oldest of the 3 sons.
With all the foreclosed houses hitting the market. My wife and I decided to start looking for a house to buy for my Mom to live the rest of her life in.
We are NOT rich. We survive.
My wife and I started saving money, and looked at a few places, for about a year. Nothing really interesting came up.
Just before the real estate market crash. The carpenter/neighbor across the street sold his beautiful house, and left the area. He sold the house for 140k, to a just married young man starting a new job at GM.
That young man lost his job, and new wife shortly there after. Not a good idea to cheat on a new wife. Soon after that the house went into foreclosure.
My wife and I started working our arses off at our jobs to get enough money to buy it. My wife even worked 2 full time jobs. We were very blessed to get the house and property. We were even more blessed to get it at 1/3 of what it sold for just a few years earlier.
The deal was always. Mom, and baggage (Step Father) get the house. I get the garage for my cars.
Well. That didn't quite work out the way I wanted it to.
The 1930 21 X 21 garage was in very bad condition. It was all I could do to keep it standing for 5 years. The garage had 1 light and 1 outlet. The slab was sinking below grade and would flood with any snow melt, or rain. The sills were rotted out and it developed a bad lean towards the neighbors yards. I could only barely fit my wife's Ranchero inside it during the winter. I did not dare put my mustang in the garage. I constantly feared the garage would collapse under snow load.
No good deed goes unpunished they say.
It also happens that this property must be declared a rental property by law.
So every 3 years the city must inspect the property and makes me repair it up to building code. So I spend a lot of time and money on the place in renovations.
It turns out that is a plus in one way.
When you have to replace a falling down garage on a rental property. That is a pretty darn good tax deduction.

So now you folks no why I built a new garage where I chose to build it.
On a side note. It just so happens that my mother will not be able to get around, living in a 3 story house much longer. Due to age, and she broke her ankle in 3 places last winter.
So after this garage build is done.
I have to start renovating my single story Ranch house. In preparation for a future house swap. So eventually I will be living across the street.
The work never ends around here. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #816 (Edited)
So the plan was to do this.
Tear down this 1930 garage.
Side note. The front of this garage was all rotted away. I replaced the original barn doors and rebuilt 2/3 of the front of this garage, and I added the garage doors in this pic.


Then build something like this.
 

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Also are they going to lay a top row of "L" block to tie the slab into the block? Just curious...

Allen
that's called a shoe block by the way, it depends on what his wall section looks like, they can drill and epoxy dowels to match his vertical reinf or just let the slab float, i'd detail the dowels if I was drawing it up.

also you can definitely see the lean in the old walls.

as another note please put #4's at 12" oc centered in the slab where you plan to put the lift particularly if it is a 2 post lift. woven wire fabric is for concrete cracking not strength,
 

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Discussion Starter #818 (Edited)
that's called a shoe block by the way, it depends on what his wall section looks like, they can drill and epoxy dowels to match his vertical reinf or just let the slab float, i'd detail the dowels if I was drawing it up.
He will be using rebar dowels. The dowels will be tied into the side of the walls. The slab will rest on these dowels, and the slab will float on top of these. The slab needs to float because of Michigan seasons. The area under the pad will be compacted to 95%. Installing the rebar dowels will ensure that the floor doesn't sink that other 5%.

This will be a 6" thick floor with reinforced steel wire mesh inside the pad. More than strong enough to support a 4 post lift.
Any extra concrete in any area can actually cause cracking.
I just don't know at this time what the post specs are. I have been told by the post maker my 6 inch reinforced floor will be more than acceptable. I also do not know exactly where the perfect placement will be for the future lift.
 

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He will be using rebar dowels. The dowels will be tied into the side of the walls. The slab will rest on these dowels, and the slab will float on top of these. The slab needs to float because of Michigan seasons. The area under the pad will be compacted to 95%. Installing the rebar dowels will ensure that the floor doesn't sink that other 5%.

This will be a 6" thick floor with reinforced steel wire mesh inside the pad. More than strong enough to support a 4 post lift.
Any extra concrete in any area can actually cause cracking.
I just don't know at this time what the post specs are. I have been told by the post maker my 6 inch reinforced floor will be more than acceptable. I also do not know exactly where the perfect placement will be for the future lift.
good its a 4 post lift, installing a 2 post lift on an unreinforced(WWF is not real reinf pretty much for crack resisitance only) slab also has overturning moment to consider, with the 4 post its simply vertical load.
 

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Great progress!

Mine is finally moving along too. Grading/concrete guy is scheduled, permits are in for review, and I finally met with the local power company to relocate my power line that's down the middle of my proposed garage floor.

I'm doing a 2 post. We're going to use rebar and drop the slab to 6". The majority of the lifts I'm looking at (9K-10K capacity) only require a 4" slab.

The majority of the 4 posts one I see only require a 4" slab as well.

I'd rather have the extra thickness, especially on a 2 post.
 
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