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I have two different questions to ask. First of all in my 65 mustang 2+2 i upgraded to front discs and power booster. My question is if there is a different pedal with a different ratio or a modification i need to make, this is bugging me pretty bad...? When I press the pedal (with the car on) it travels a good 4-5 inches before the brake gets hard. Theres no air in the lines either, I ve bled them good. When the car is off the pedal is pretty hard up top.
Also I came across a block with casting numbers C90E-6015-CZ, I know its from a 69 fairlane, but is it a 351w or 302? I cant figure out what that CZ means. The person says its a 302, and it has 302 heads.
Thanks in advance... i know this is a long message!
 

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the book says a C9OE is a "GOOD" 351W block ,,a rule of thumb,a windsor block is wider than a 302 block at the intake manifold,,, also if it is together,, a 351 W you can get a socket on the bottom water neck bolt on a 289-302 you have to use a wrench because the water pump is in the way as

far as the pedal I don't know for sure on a 65-65 but there is a difference in the later years,,the reason the pedal is hard all the way when the car is off is because there is no vacumn helping to push the pedal in
 

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The pedal is hard with the engine off because you aren't getting any power boost to help you with pedal effort.

The pedal may be overtraveling during normal operation if your brakes are out of adjustment. In particular if your shoes in back are too far off the drum when retracted, or you pads in front are too far off the rotors, your brake pedal will travel a long way as the fluid pushes the pads/shoes all the way out to meet the drums/rotors.

They are supposed to adust up automatically as you brake in reverse. However, you can speed the process by adjusting them by hand. For example if you have drums in back, you can pull the wheels and drums and spin the brake adjuster to spread the shoes more. I adjusted mine by running them out until I could feel a drag (once I put the drum back on) and then backing them in a click or two. The calipers in front will be a bit trickier. Check and see if you have a lot of distance between the pads and the rotor with a feeler gauge.

If they are too far off, you can adjust them by hand as well.

Phil

p.s. I don't know what "normal" pedal travel is with your set up. If the car stops fine, and you can take all 4 brakes to full lock...then maybe it's OK. I just don't know.
 
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