Vintage Mustang Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been awhile since I installed an automatic trans onto a new motor. So my question is: Do you bolt the torque converter onto the flexplate and then install the trans.? OR do you keep the torque converter on the trans and install onto flexplate and bolt it onto the flexplate thru the lower inspection cover?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
I have "ALWAYS" installed the torque convertor on to the trans before bolting the trans to the motor on one of these classics.
 

·
I won a special award
Joined
·
7,409 Posts
I have "ALWAYS" installed the torque convertor on to the trans before bolting the trans to the motor on one of these classics.

That is the correct way to do it. That way you ensure the torque converter is correctly seated on the pump input and stator shafts. As a teenager I tried to bolt the converter to the flexplate first and than install the transmission. The converter didn't seat on the stator shaft and caused the flexplate to be pushed forward into the back of the engine block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Always install the converter on the trans. You need to make sure it is properly seated, otherwise you're crush the pump or burn up the transmission if it's not. You'll never get it properly seated with it bolted to the flexplate first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
when you put the torque converter on the trans, you should hear some distinctive "clunks" as it slides on the front pump stator support. You should have a large space between the ends of the converter studs and the back of the flex plate making it necessary to pull the converter forward to get the nuts threaded on the studs. If you don't get the nose of the converter in the flats of the gear in the front pump and tighten the trans mounting bolts down, you will break the gear in the front pump. One of the "clunks" you will hear when you start the converter in the front pump is when the flats on the back nose of the converter it goes in the mating flats of the front pump gear. Check twice and then start the bolts pulling the trans up against the block. Any resistance, stop and do it again. LOL Jerry
 

·
Just some guy
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
In case you haven't gotten it, FULLY seating the converter into the transmission first is very important. If you don't you can about bet on breaking the pump in the transmission. Some good advice in this thread.
I like to put the transmission on the back of the engine and run the bellhousing bolts in by hand without tightening them. Then check one more time that the converter studs are just barely in the flexplate. Then tighten at least some of the bellhousing bolts and check the converter one more time. There should be just enough threads to start a nut on and you should be able to shake the converter back and forth just a little by grabbing a converter stud with your fingertips.
Screwing the installation up by not getting the converter all the way in is a REALLY common screwup. Since a lot of folks only install a transmission once every fifteen years or so, a freshening up on how to do it is excellent thinking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,138 Posts
All these post hit the nail on the head. Make damned sure that TQ is ALL the way in. Check out some YouTube videos if you feel uncomfortable with your skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Does this inner spline seem to be protruding to far. I think this is what’s keeping the TC from seating.
Any help would be appreciated
Yep, that shaft isn't captive in the transmission, so it probably slid out. Rotate it while trying to re-seat it.
You can see in this pic how far back that shaft should sit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Yep, that shaft isn't captive in the transmission, so it probably slid out. Rotate it while trying to re-seat it.
You can see in this pic how far back that shaft should sit.
I’ve rotated both directions as well as pulling while rotating as well as pushing while rotating. Nothing happens.
One time tonight my buddy was tapping the shaft and I was shifting the shifter ( auto ) and the shaft just popped right in. Problem is we pulled it back out to see if it was working properly and now it’s not going back in. Or out. Pulled with vice grips. It’s stuck. It rotates but won’t go in or out.
 

·
Just some guy
Joined
·
20,219 Posts
Ugh. I quite frankly didn't know you could do that on a C4. I've seen it MANY times on later model 5R55W's though. Last one was a real bear. I have a pair good quality vice grips that I clamped on the input shaft that have a fitting on them accepts a slide hammer. I had to beat it pretty hard to get it out. That one scored the splines a bit but I was able to smooth them back out with a hand file. Usually I clamp the vice grips on the shaft sideways, normally, like you would on a bolt. Then take a long prybar and using the edge of the bellhousing I can use the vice grips as a pry point and pop the input shaft on out. Since this aligns the teeth of the vice grips with the splines it barely makes a mark on them if they slip a bit. The slide hammer method requires clamping at a right angle and a lot tighter as they have less grip on the shaft in that orientation. Hopefully you don't have to resort to that method.

I'm sure once you get it out it will slide right back in when you get it lined up properly. That has been my experience. I frankly have no idea how such splined shafts can get misaligned but they surely can and do.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top