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what if any damage would be caused by having a transmission overfilled. also is this the correct way to check the transmission fluid level?

start it up, run it through all the gears, then back to park, and check with engine running. i know the newer cars have a hot and cold mark, but my 302 only has one mark, is this for cold hot, lukewarm?

i'm just curious more than anything. mine reads on the high side but runs ok and has no problems that i can detect. i filled it over a little cause it was leaking pretty good when it was sitting for a long period, i guess the driving season has the pan gasket seal reconditioned cause it has quit leaking, i suspect when it sits again it will start leaking. Maybe i should install that new pan gasket i bought, it doesnt seem to work just having it in the trunk /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif
 

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It's not good to have it much overfull. Most sticks have two arrows or two holes and the level should be between the two. To check it the fluid should be hot and the car idling in park.
 

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Read your post again. The mark on your stick is probably the hot level. Need to drive the car a ways to get the fluid hot enough to check. That's the way I've always done mine anyway. Not saying it's the only way, though. Others may have different ideas.
 

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When in doubt, check the ATF level hot, in Park on level ground.

If overfull, you may note bubbles in fluid....this is caused by the ATF getting caught up by the rotating parts and whipped into foam...

Bad thing is that gear pumps don't pump foam efficiently and actuators and valves function poorly with it as a medium....if you see bubbles or experience erratic transmission operation, I'd suggest reducing the level...you can drain some ATF out painlessly by removing a drain plug in the converter or popping the dipstick tube out....personally, I'd do the converter plug. Make a good argument for a drain pan plug, eh? *G*

What you may be experiencing is some fluid leaking back from the converter during the storage season and creating an artificially high level in the trans case, leading to leakage from the vent, seals or gasket...Try popping the dipstick after the car has sat a couple of weeks and read the level....compare it with a cold level checked now while you're driving every day...

Good luck!
 
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I have been gyrating around with this same problem for some time. (With some very valuable information supplied by camachinist). I have noticed that on my 67 C-4 the CORRECT level for the trans. fluid is right at the TOP of the machined opening of the trans. case. This is where the dip stick tube is inserted in the case. The level is not X mm below this point nor is it Y mm above this point. It is exactly at the top machined level. Remember, we are dealing with Ford and ANYTHING is subject to variation. I am only telling you what is reality with my 67. In other words, if you pull the dipstick tube, nothing should run out. Further, sometimes the trans. fluid does flow back from the converter to the case. This shows a higher level of fluid than is normal. There is a valve that should prevent this---but it sometimes leaks over a period of time. I am doing some research on this and I am receiving a lot of conflicting data and opinions. The valve seems to be located in the stator support----which is not addressed clearly in the Ford shop manual. I evidently have overlooked this detail in the few rebuilds that I have effected. I yield to those that really know. The valve is quite simple and is presumably foolproof!! As an engineer I subscribe to the KISS principle----keep it simple stupid! That's probably why I still use points in the dizzy. Hope this helps. I anticipate a positive response from camachinist as I respect his knowledge and gentle manner. Best regards John
 
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