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I feel stupid asking this question however I dont know and dont want to screw this up so I will bite my pride and ask anyways. Trying to put my I6 and C4 back together so we can bolt them up together tommarrow afternoon(after school ecck) however I dont know how it bolts together. Does it go, starter motor bracket, flex plate, ring, then the 6 bolts torqued down and then the torque converter gets the 4 bolts put onto the flex plate. And one other thing, do I need a flywheel on this car since the torque converter has teeth like the flywheel. First time Ive ever done this job so any help is much appreciated!
 

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im not totally familiar with i6's but typical v8 and whatnot will be setup similarly. Sounds like you have it correct but ill clarify. There is an engine block plate probably, which goes on first. This is a thin metal plate, use rtv to hold against the block (i think this is what you called a starter motor bracket, it has a whole in it for the starter), then flywheel (flexplate), then the ring and the 6 bolts. Remember that there is only 1 way the flywheel will go on. The weighted side of the flywheel should face the back of the engine. The flywheel has 6 bolts, so you must put it on the end of the crankshaft and guess the pattern. It will not go on any other way but the correct way, so to keep the engine properly balanced. Once you figure out the pattern, you should probably use some locktite on the 6 bolts. remember the bolts need to be torqued and the crankshaft WILL turn if you try to torque the bolts, so you must figure out a way to prevent the flywheel from turning, like putting a socket and wrench on the damper bolt. Loctite dries quickly, so if you choose to use it, be quick and ready and dont forget the ring, which also has a pattern. Every car will need a flywheel. The starter bolts to the tranny through the engine block plate and the gears mesh with the flywheel, they will not touch the torque convertor. Interesting that there are teeth on it, make sure there is not a flywheel on it already i suppose! Make sure the torque convertor is engaged on its spline on the tranny shaft. Put the convertor on the shaft and push it in and turn it until it slides in place. Then mate the engine to tranny. Try your best to line up the torque convertor holes on the flywheel with the bolts from the actual torque convertor. It will ease installation. Good luck
 

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There is no flywheel, just the butterfly-looking flexplate that joins the converter to the crankshaft. No business with weights to worry about.
Put the engine-transmission separator plate on the engine first. Then bolt the flexplate to the crankshaft. Make absolutely sure the torque converter is ALL the way down in the bellhousing. It should be so far in it scrapes the bellhousing a little if you turn it. This means that it is completely mated to the transmission input shafts. This is important.
Now you can start bolting the tranny on. Guide the converter bolts to the holes in the flexplate while you do it. On some trannys the bolts won't even touch the flexplate, this is fine. Bolt up the tranny and then fiddle the converter up to the flexplate and bolt it in.
And you're pretty well done.
Except that I've forgotten whether the 6 tranny takes 4 nuts, or 4 bolts. Well, that will be obvious anyway. If it takes bolts, then upon install the converter should just brush the flexplate. In any case if the converter is mashed hard up against the flexplate, that means the converter is not seated on the input shafts. Pull the tranny back off and reseat it. Spin it around, fiddle with with it, whatever until it goes all the way into the bellhousing.
 
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