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Discussion Starter #1
Update: still not starting. But I have some more to check. My timing light is shot, so I can't do much more checking now.
All plugs and wires are in correct order.
I will take a break for now. I have to get the car aligned yet, and a garage is literally up the street from me. Maybe I will get the car there and have them see why it isn't starting, and get it aligned too.
No.. I'm not aligning it myself. I give you guys credit for what you know, but I can't spend as much time I as I would like trying to get it to work. Sometimes it is better to break down and pay someone else to do it for you.
Thanks for all the help, but I am admitting defeat on this one, and letting it to the experts. (I hope)
If I can get the car to the garage this week, I will give an update next week.
Thanks again.
 

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Haven't seen your previous posts, but usually "not starting" is not that tough to figure out why. Remember you only need 3 things: fuel, spark, and compression. If you're determined to take it to a shop, at least get references on the shop you're choosing. Just because they make a living (or try to) working on cars, doesn't necessarily mean they know what they're doing, or that they'll do it right.

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

http://www.classic-mustang.net/johnpro
 

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(thanks to Pat's search advice). So the engine's never been started since the rebuild. Sounds like one of 2 simple things:

1) your distributor is 180 degrees out (or just totally wrong). As Midlife had said, the vaccum advance is meaningless. The rotor must be pointing at about #1 distirubutor post when #1 cylinder is at TDC of compression stroke. There's basically no other way to put a distributor in and have any clue that it's close enough to work.

OR

2) The intial valve lash is too tight and you have no compression. If those vavles don't close, you'll have no compression and the engine won't fire.

You mentioned the "compression" sound from the caruburator. This is either firing on the wrong stroke (option 1 above) or the sound of the piston pushing the air back through the carburartor because the intake valve is open (option 2 above).

In either case, it should be a quicky fix.

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

http://www.classic-mustang.net/johnpro
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry Dude I am not letting you give up.

First the other guys are right its either not on true TDC or the valves are not set right. These will cause back fire thru the carb.
It could be ignition but I think I remember you saying that you had spark. Re-check the + and - at the coil. Are you using points or something else? If it is points then are you sure that the gap is set right?

Second you don't need a timing gun. They are good for fine tuning but not necessary for starting up.
The easiest method I have for figuring out TDC is to stick your finger in the #1 spark plug hole. Crank the car and watch the dampner timing marks. You will feel it try to suck your finger in or blow it out. TDC occurs twice, once for the compression and once for getting the exhaust out. You want the compression one, the one that feels like it is going to blow your finger out. Just after it stops blowing keep an eye on the timing mark and shine a flash light to see the top of the piston. The timing mark should be about right on.

Next drop the dist. Figure out where the #1 plug is in relation to where the rotor is pointing (put the cap on and mark the dist body with a marker where the #1 plug is). Take the cap off and move the rotor a little to the left because when it goes it the gears will cause the rotor to rotate to the right (clockwise). This might take a few tries but once you get it all should be well. Also keep in mind that you will have some room for adjustment when setting the timing so it doesn't need to be exactly right on.

I have had exp with engine builders over tightening a 66 289 valves too tight because I think that after 67 they went to positive stop type (might be wrong on the year) and those valves are adjusted differently. But the typical engine builder today is not that smart and works in a sweat shop and just throws the stuff together, also they don't build many of these adjustable ford engines and quite possible may not be aware that it is different. It happened to me but that doesn't mean its the case with you, just a possibility.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Vynil's comments are dead on! Your most likely culprit as the distributor is 180 deg out. Use Vynil's procedure for finding TDC on the compression stroke, but stick your finger OVER the spark plug hole, not in it. You could lose a finger easy that way!

My engine wouldn't start this morning (after oil leak chasing over the weekend), because I forgot to attach the Petronix black lead to the "-" stud on the coil. After that, It started sluggishly (I had alot of gas to burn off!).

If you're worried about no compression, do a compression test. The Original VMF had a great tutorial (post) as to how to accomplish. If you've compression pressures around what the Shop Manual says, you're in business.

Keep trying. I had a Mustang speciality shop charge me a few Jackson's to un wrangle the sparl plug wires, to get an engine to start - A ddofus Award extraordiare! You'll really appreciate the satisfaction of doing it yourself.

Thanks,

Mike
'66 Springtime Yellow Coupe
289, slightly warmed over
driven daily
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thats really funny Mike. Yea after thinking about it don't stick you finger in there very far.
 

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If your old Mustang is 180 degrees out of time and you have a phobia about removing the distributor, simply install an old Mopar rotor button.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
This may seem obvious, but it cost me several hours of grief.

Until 2 years ago, I had never owned a Ford. I had always worked on Small block Chevys(eek!). Make sure you are hooking up your plug wires in the correct firing order. I mean clockwise VS counterclockwise. Ford and Chevy are DIFFERENT. Ask me how I know :)

In my mind, I was doing it all correctly.....except it was correct for a Chevy, not a Ford. I still cannot tell you which it is, for sure because of this, I believe Counterclockwise...heh.

Good luck!!

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