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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,
I have a 66 with a T5 and a tired old 289. I'd like to install a nice running 1989 mustang 5.0 HO I found from a local foxbody guy. The problem is, I only know carburetors. Like all of us, I'm doing this on a budget. I'm also not familiar with fuel cells.

My understanding is that my stock tank will not work for an efi setup with a return/send line because it has no internal baffles. This will cause fuel starvation issues from what I've read? I do not want to install one of those $1,700 racing fuel cells that are a direct replacement. I am willing to install a universal 15-20 gallon fuel cell. I'm capable of fabbing up mount for it in my trunk, but again I really know nothing about setting up a fuel injection system.

  • What fuel cell (or other type of tank?) would be good to use with this 5.0 setup?
  • What type of sender/pump do I need? Will it work with my autometer 10-73 ohm fuel gauge?
What other information can anyone give me on setting up my first efi install on this old girl?

I really appreciate any info! Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
why not just carb the 5.0?
I'm actually considering doing that. The idea was that I thought it would be nice to have fuel injection. I also thought this would be a great way to really learn how efi systems work. I drive the car a lot currently, even in the cold winters, and fuel injection would be a nice improvement on the car.
Thanks!
 

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This should help

 

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A list of some thinking points as you consider your project:

Decide what fuel injection controller you are going to use. Then make a list of the sensor inputs that controller uses to control the fuel delivery (fuel injectors). Once you have the sensor list, consider each one to see if you're satisfied that you can install it on your car (location and wiring needs). Also, decide where you'll install the controller itself along with whatever wiring it needs. If the controller will also be controlling the timing, be sure to include those components in your plan. Fuel injectors are really only valves that control how much fuel is allowed to squirt in from the high pressure fuel line. So you'll need to make sure your fuel pressure matches the expectation of whatever controller you'll be using. Be sure to include in your plan the needs of your new fuel delivery system such as a fuel return line. Finally, be sure you understand how you will connect to your ECU (controller) so that you can both set it up initially as well as try to diagnose any future issues you will have with the car.
 

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The 289 and 302 blocks are the same "enough" to run your existing intake, carb, water pump, timing cover, and oil pan without issue. I think the old factory EFI's ship has sailed as far as ease to accomplish and cost VS a self tuning Holley Snipper or FiTech EFI.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This should help

I'm sure you've probably answered this a million times, but what year range and vehicles do you suggest I grab an engine like yours? Also, do the cranks have the provision for a pilot bushing? I want to keep my T5.

Thanks Husk!
 

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There are many threads about swapping EFI Mustang GT engines into classic Mustangs. It would be best to have a donor car with all the parts rather than just an engine. You will need the complete engine wiring harness and ECU. You also might want an AOD transmission if you have an automatic. If you have a complete enough donor car the nylon fuel line can be reused and many other parts. Those cars have a returnless fuel system, I think. This swap is a common one and many fuel tanks, pumps, and modules are available.

If you don't have a whole donor car, you could go with one of these nice kits:
HOLLEY SNIPER EFI RETURNLESS MASTER KIT
Edelbrock Pro-Flo 4 EFI Traditional 4150
Plan on spending at least a few hundred more $$$ on top of the price of these kits.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks like everyone's input here is right. My best bet may be to either carb it, or use an aftermarket efi setup if I want fuel injection.
 

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The tank issue isn’t so bad. You can get fuel cells for FI way cheaper than what you posted. Best bet for a street car is to go to a salvage yard or LKQ and get a late model fuel tank similar to what is used with the donor engine you have now. If it’s in rough shape inside you can treat the internals of the tank with a variety of solutions.

Were I doing a swap like that I’d use the existing donor harness, ECU and FI or the aftermarket “performance“ crate engine electronics and FI. For a first time project going that way is a pretty steep curve and may require some diagnostics equipment that’s expensive and difficult to find to rent. Plus you’d need to know how to use it though that can be learned online. If you strip it all down and go the Sniper route it will be an easier learning curve and you’ll get just as good (or perhaps better) performance
 

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I have to agree with one of the previous comments: carbs are for old inflexible "stuck" guys (I'm 69 years old, and one of that crowd, so I can say this); fuel injection is the ONLY way to go. The arguemnts are like those I heard in the 1960s from diehard American car owners about why DRUM BRAKES were better than disc brakes! ...hanging desperately onto something that they understood, and unwilling to change to something that was new.
FI gives the ability to control fuel delivery infinitely easier than with carbs. It's a dimension that you need to master -- it has been the future for at least 30 years! If you are changing from original, GO FI.

If ONLY I had known about the Holley Sniper when I put a 5.0 into my 1956 Jag XK140 (started 2 years ago)!
It is a glorious pain in the ass installing all the darned components from the 1995 Mustang 5.0 that I used to get the Jag running running -- whereas I could simply have gotten a 302ci and "sniped" it.
From what I hear, it is easy.

On the other hand, I have a Holley carb on my 66 Mustang and 3 SU's on my 68 Jag 420G -- turns out that ORIGINALITY is the way to go -- any performance changes you make to classic cars turn out to be obsolete within 3-5 years with the latest performance improvements. Stay original.
Think about this: a 1963 Vette split window with a 454 carb'd engine, vs a 63 Vette with original engine -- that 454 is so underpowered and obsolete compared to having an LT or LS engine that you'd have to keep changing engines, but meanwhile, having an original 63 engine is golden.

Just my evoled opinion, after having spent several decades on both sides of the fence.
 

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Yep - in my case with the 5.0 in my '56 XK140, I routed a 1/2" OD bendable aluminum tubing back into the rubber part of the gas tank fill tube. There is an adapter piece you can buy specifically for this purpose -- search for "return fuel line kit (or adapter)".
 

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Well, aside from swapping the oil pan and pickup (front sump) and possibly the dipstick to a timing cover location, the only other "obstacles" are wiring (grab the EFI harness and ECU from the '89), a "conversion" radiator (driver's side outlet), a clutch pivot ball bracket (if you're using the original Z-bar linkage), and an EFI-capable fuel tank (and line... keep the existing 5/16" fuel line for a return and run a new 3/8" line right next to it. You can get a 22-gallon EFI fuel tank for around $250. Don't forget to skank the '89's trunk-mounted pendulum switch.

FWIW, unless the '89 is a California model with the Mass Air system I'd chuck the Speed Density setup and go with a CFI setup like a Sniper or Pro-Jection, etc.
 

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  • What fuel cell (or other type of tank?) would be good to use with this 5.0 setup?
  • What type of sender/pump do I need? Will it work with my autometer 10-73 ohm fuel gauge?
What other information can anyone give me on setting up my first efi install on this old girl?

I really appreciate any info! Thanks!
I went with Aeromotive's Gen2 Stealth Tank. It drops right in and the connections are in the stock location making using the existine for the return, easy peasy. I went with 3/8" hard line for the supply. But the stock fuel rails are 5/16". I don't know that using 3/8" is beneficial at all.


Are you getting the complete EFI system from the donor? EEC-IV, harnesses, sensors. You'll want an ECU compatible with your T5.

Alot of the old sites with conversion info is gone. But there's still plenty of good info out there.
A few links to get you started:
 

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You can put a inline fuel pump with the appropriate line to the original outlet from the tank and runt the return line to the drain plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ok guys, I've decided to go a different route. I purchased a 1999 Mercury Mountaineer 5.0 with 114K miles on it. I'm going to carb it for now since i've already got a brand new holley and I'm doing the swap on a budget. I'm following Huskinhano's thread. My next project may be efi next year once I've run my 5.0 for a while. For the time being, I basically just want to have a nice reliable engine that can actually do a burn out! My tired old 289 needed a complete rebuild and has no guts, even with my 3:55 trac lock. I may be starting a new thread. Thanks for all of the input!
 
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