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Every time I leave my car sit for a while, when I fire it up moisture comes out of the exhaust pipes and makes water spots on the floor of my garage.. The cars runs great with no issues and I am not losing coolant. I'm guessing it's just condensation… Does anyone else have this issue?
 

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If only that were all that comes out of our exhaust pipes.

My stepdaughter (age 10) smiles when I start up the GT and says you are starting up the "smelly" car. Kids today don't know good old school V8 fumes when they smell them any more. Car is running fine, no worries there. But I'd love to run the GT thru a smog check, just to see the look on some tree hugger's face with his oh-so-nice Honda as I drive up and peg the needles out!!! }:|
 

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Mine does the same thing. No worries
 

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This is the way all cool cars mark their territories. :thumbup:
 

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Heh, It's the best feeling in the world to know that the only thing coming out of the exhaust is a little condensation.

Could be a lot worse. Ask me how I know :shocked:
 

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Probably preaching to the choir, here but... the moisture is condensed from the burning of your fossil fuel and is not only normal, but required evidence your car actually runs. ;) When the car is warmed up, the vapor is warm enough not to condense in the exhaust system and won't be seen outside except on cold mornings or when the relative humidity is high and the newly added moisture takes a while to dissipate. The most basic hydrocarbon combustion equation is C4 +2O2 = CO2 +2H2O, which in English is a hydrocarbon molecule + 2 oxygen molecules will burn (oxidize) to form a carbon dioxide molecule plus 2 water molecules. Of course, combustion of air is rarely perfect or complete and so will also form soot, nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monixide (CO) and other things.
 

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mines does the same thing
 

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Sorry about this. Couldn't resist sharing. I had a '56 Ford 312 4V with factory duals.
Had the car from '62-'75, it was my daily driver. The mufflers average life was about
2 years because of the water condensation. I figure that car went trough at least
12 mufflers and almost as many tail pipes, the engine pipes lasted longer because
they ran hotter.
 

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Old Explorers had a drain hole in the muffler to allow condensation to run out. On more than one occasion the guys at inspection stations wanted to fail the car because it had a hole in the muffler.

Drilling a tiny hole in the lowest part of a muffler might not be a bad idea on a car that isn't run very often.
 

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Drilling a small hole in the muffler was common practice for many years. In recent
years most vehicles have stainless steel tail pipe and muffler.
 

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slim said:
Sorry about this. Couldn't resist sharing. I had a '56 Ford 312 4V with factory duals.
Had the car from '62-'75, it was my daily driver. The mufflers average life was about
2 years because of the water condensation. I figure that car went trough at least
12 mufflers and almost as many tail pipes, the engine pipes lasted longer because
they ran hotter.
Same thing here. My GT originally came through from Ford as a single exhaust (to my dad's great chagrin - he thought GT's were all duals!)
So, he got the first replacement muffler from Speedy, and they had the life of the car guarantee. The 289 kept producing water as a by combustion byproduct, and kept rusting out mufflers every couple of years. We got 15 or 16 free ones out of them before the car was essentially taken off the road prior to restoration. If only tires and batteries had the same deal. And then there's this issue about the gas tank always going empty....
 

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BornInAFord said:
Probably preaching to the choir, here but... the moisture is condensed from the burning of your fossil fuel and is not only normal, but required evidence your car actually runs. ;) When the car is warmed up, the vapor is warm enough not to condense in the exhaust system and won't be seen outside except on cold mornings or when the relative humidity is high and the newly added moisture takes a while to dissipate. The most basic hydrocarbon combustion equation is C4 +2O2 = CO2 +2H2O, which in English is a hydrocarbon molecule + 2 oxygen molecules will burn (oxidize) to form a carbon dioxide molecule plus 2 water molecules. Of course, combustion of air is rarely perfect or complete and so will also form soot, nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monixide (CO) and other things.

This is the best reason to whenever you start your car up, you should always let it get up to temperature before shutting it off.

Otherwise the engine isn't hot enough to evaporate all the moisture collected and it will sit in your engine/pipes until the next time it is fired up and warmed to temperature.

Chaz
 

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71DarkHorse said:
BornInAFord said:
Probably preaching to the choir, here but... the moisture is condensed from the burning of your fossil fuel and is not only normal, but required evidence your car actually runs. ;) When the car is warmed up, the vapor is warm enough not to condense in the exhaust system and won't be seen outside except on cold mornings or when the relative humidity is high and the newly added moisture takes a while to dissipate. The most basic hydrocarbon combustion equation is C4 +2O2 = CO2 +2H2O, which in English is a hydrocarbon molecule + 2 oxygen molecules will burn (oxidize) to form a carbon dioxide molecule plus 2 water molecules. Of course, combustion of air is rarely perfect or complete and so will also form soot, nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monixide (CO) and other things.

This is the best reason to whenever you start your car up, you should always let it get up to temperature before shutting it off.

Otherwise the engine isn't hot enough to evaporate all the moisture collected and it will sit in your engine/pipes until the next time it is fired up and warmed to temperature.

Chaz
= RUST
 
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