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My MIG welder's instruction manual says that extension cords will cause a crappier weld or something like that. It's going to suck if that's true because the cord on my welder is pretty short and I have to weld in my floors.
What should I do, welders?

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Evan
67-5.0L
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Because a 120VAC MIG welder uses most of the standard 20A that most 120VAC recepticles are wired for, if you then plug in some 100 FT 16/2 extension cord, it WILL degradate the function of the welder. I built a special 30FT 10/2 cord with 30A ends for using with my welder, Probably overkill). If you limit the lenght to a 25 or30 FT cord that is at least 12/2 you will be fine.

Hal
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I made a custom cord for mine as well...If you don't want to do that you can check your local hardware or Home Depot type store for appliance extension cords usually designated for air conditioners or 20 amp clothes dryers and the like.
 

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Evan,
Most professionals have short welder power cords (the longest in my shop is 6ft of 8 guage with a 50 amp NEMA plug) and long secondary cables (mine average between 25 and 50ft).

With the proper guage secondary (welding) cables, there will be no current loss. A welding supply house can properly outfit cabling to fit your needs...

If you're using a light duty, 120V welder, I'd recommend a 12 guage extension cord no longer than 15 ft......

What will happen if the welder demands more current than the primary cord can provide, the primary cord heats, creating even more resistance to current flow, which exacerbates the demand for current as well as degrading performance. Ultimately, it will either burn up the cord or trip the circuit breaker....BTW, make sure you're on a 20A 120V breaker for the above described application.

If you have a 220V welder, you'll need a setup similar to what I use in the shop and a 40 or 50A breaker, depending on application

Pat
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What I did was run another 10/2 line to the garage.I use this exclusively for the welder.I ran 10/2 to 3 outlets surrounding the car.I also picked up 8 feet of 12/2 and made an extension cord just in case.I think I went a little overboard.
 
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