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Discussion Starter #1
I have an Eastwood Mig 175, using .035 wire and I'm having a problem with burn through on 18 ga sheet metal. I have the machine set at its lowest setting. If I switch to .023 or .030 wire will it help to prevent the burn through? Right now, even a spot weld is hit or miss on thin stock.
 

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Yes. The amount of heat generated by that large of wire (think puddle size) when melting would make thinner material difficult to weld. You will like .023/.025" wire much better. Be sure to check your feed roll wheels for correct wire size (if it has specific rollers for different size wire).
 

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I have the same machine and use the thinner wire. Much easier to weld without burning through. I still have to do a series of spot welds and not short beads on the body panels though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got a spool of Hobart .025 at Tractor Supply. Seems to work much better on thin material.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Your speed setting and movement will also play a factor in burning through.
With the .035 wire, and the welder set on its lowest settings, anything more than a quick zap will burn through. With the .025 wire, I have to turn the welder up around 8 on the power to get any penetration when welding some 1/8" stock. I may try some .030 and see how that works. Right now Hobart wire is cheap at Tractor Supply.
 

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With the .035 wire, and the welder set on its lowest settings, anything more than a quick zap will burn through. With the .025 wire, I have to turn the welder up around 8 on the power to get any penetration when welding some 1/8" stock. I may try some .030 and see how that works. Right now Hobart wire is cheap at Tractor Supply.
.035 is very heavy for sheet metal. I have gotten lazy, I weld everything with .030 just adjusting heat and wire speed. Thanks for the TS tip, I will stop by there later.
 

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Wire size is a function of heat input to the weld. The bigger the wire the more heat. Bigger wire allows more current flow even when set at the same feed rate and voltage. That’s why on the smaller wire you couldn’t get good penetration on the setting where the bigger wire blew a hole in it. Wire size, feed speed and voltage need to be used in different combinations depending on the thickness of the metal.

A .035 wire is too big for small gauge material. I start using .035 at .120 wall, use .030 down to 18 ga or so and .025 for smaller sizes. The last body panel repair I did on the Mustang was with silicon bronze using TIG. For non structural welds it’s a handy way to do it.
 

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A friend that's a welder told me that he prefers Harbor Freight's wire for welding thin metal because there's less metal in it.
 
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