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I need to fill in some holes in the hood left from the scoop. I do not have a MIG and do not want to stick weld them. What about using an oxy-acet torch and welding them. I worry about the heat distorting the metal.

Or should I take it to someone....

Layne

69-GT F Code Sportsroof
00 - Dodge Ram 1500 - My daily driver
95 - Dodge Stratus LS - SWMBO daily driver
92 - Ford Tempo GL - Daughters beast
 

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If you are comfortable with the stick welder you could use the smallest electrode you can get, back up the hole with a piece of aluminum or brass, and surround the area with a wet towel with the machine as cold as you can run it. Otherwise the torch could possibly warp the material too much.
 
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I agree with the heat problem using the torch method, are they big holes? You might try you hand at the old art of using lead to fill in, requires less heat.

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hi doug2stanger here
i got tired of the antenna on my 68.
I removed it and cut out a small round
piece of sheet metal and butt welded it in
with a mig. no heat damage to metal at all
of course it blackened some of the paint, i should
of sanded down to bare metal a little farther out.
All i needed that was a very very thin layer of filler.

If you use a mig on a flat surface like the hood,
make sure you cover up the surrounding material with
something to keep the sparks from burning the paint
up to two feet away. hope this helps.
later



douglas rhine of nebraska
the man with the sad dog face
 

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Even the best of welders will have problems. The hood is the most visually straight piece on a car, and any wavyness will be immediately apparent. Once welded in, one has to use Bondo or similar filling material to get the flat appearance, but mirror smoothness is very very hard to achieve. Plus, the heat from the engine will cause the Bondo to expand at a different rate than the sheetmetal. My advice: get a repro hood.

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I bet you don't want to hear this but.....

I agree with Midlife, get another hood. You may get it straight now but it's gonna move as the weather/sun changes and you'll always be looking at it. Almost anywhere else on the car I'd say mig it.

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Layne,
Are you filling in rivet or screw holes for a fake scoop or the big air cleaner hole for a functioning one?

If the former, there must be a way to do it besides welding....fibre-filled epoxy comes to mind...

If the latter, I agree with Midlife, et al....get the repro hood unless this is some rare, irreplaceable piece or just hard to find, like on a 64.5...in that case, get the repro hood...*G*

Trust me, I've block sanded enough steel and fiberglass on the race car to know exactly what they mean...

You'll be staring at your decision for as long as you own the car...

Pat
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