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Discussion Starter #1
I will soon be doing a fair amount of patching/panel replacement on my car, and wanted to get you guys' opinions on some of my welding options.

I have two options for welding: A MIG welder or a "stitch welder" The stitch welder uses a solenoid to vibrate the electrode, the idea being that there is very little heat buildup on the workpiece and therefore very little warping. Unfortunately, the stitch welder uses a flux-coated electrode that makes for very messy welds. Which of these two options would you recommend?

I have also heard varying things about what kind of weld is best. Better to have a long weld along the entire length of the joint or a bunch of smaller ones and just full in the rest of the joint with body solder or filler?

Any answers to these questions (or tips on good books to get) would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

-matt k.
 

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MIG.. nuff said
LONG WELDS! actually you want the long weld made up of smaller welds, with no spots left for seam sealer (except the occasional pinhole)
 

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I'll third Shagg's vote. The only thing to add would be to alternate the weld to each end of the seam. This allows the the metal to cool a little and reduces warping. At least it worked for me, and I was arc/stitch welding.
 
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Matt K - If I might offer an alternative? I have restored a few vehicles and if you have minimal welding skills like I do, going with a panel adhesive system is absolutely the way to go!! You could either use a product called Fusor or SEM..I have used both on many applications and I think Fusor is better IMHO. The beauty of this stuff is that you won't warp the metal or burn through it and at the same time you can get a continuous "weld" for such panels as a quarter panel. You will also not need to spend the better part of a weekend grinding down the welds. Give it a shot and you'll only use that welder in the future for structural work!
 
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