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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there,

Went to view my car in the body shop yesterday. Spend an hour talking to him. I always seem to learn a million things in that short hour!

In general, the car is almost as bare as it should be. So far the only thicker filler was found on the tail light panel. The rest of the car was quite filler free, though not completely.

What amazed me most, was the process used on all loose sheetmetal and the finish it left. Fenders, hood, trunk, headlight buckets, etc...all were subjected to a process like powder coating yet different.

What they did was the following. All panels were put in an oven for 24 hours which baked off the paint in every nook and cranny. Then all panels were media blasted to a smooth 100% paint free metal shine. After that, the panels were put into an electrically charged paint bath after which they were put in an oven at 180 degrees Celcius to harden. The process leaves a very smooth and hard black finish to the panel.

The biggest surprise was however that all panels completely survived the process. Why a surprise, well the stuff is 35 years old and goes in the oven fully painted. Any wholes filled over with bondo don't show up until all the paint is gone. Yet there was no damage to any of the panels. Only the passenger door has 3 small pinholes in it, this will be fixed of course. The cost weren't even very high considering the amount off loose body panels on a fully stripped Mustang.

This really amazed me, and once again confirmed the outings of body shops that my car looked solid. When I started stripping the car that was a great fear.....what would come out from under the paint. Some bondo was expected, but this little is a pleasant surprise.

I can't wait to see it painted.....

Just wanted to share this process with you.




Columbo

First time rolling restoration, 66 289 nearing completion.
 

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Interesting process.

Is it new, or is this something they've been doing over in Europe for some time? I have certainly seen cars chemically dipped and/or media blasted here in the US, but never seen this 'baking' process.

It does sound like powder coating. Do they guaranty the work from future rust-through?

Let us know how things work out.

Glenn Morgan 66 GT Fastback 351w+toploader
 

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Who is doing this for you? Sounds like a very comprehensive way to make sure all hidden rust (and Bondo) is removed before you shoot a new paint job.
I spoke to a rep. from Redi-Strip in Jackson MS, and they "bake" cars to strip them as well. All old paint and Bondo - gone. And no residual chemicals to worry about coming out of seams etc to ruin a new paint job.
Congrats on finding a solid pony! Dickson

1965 GT fastback
There's a fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness" - Dave Barry
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey,

It is definately not powder coating, but similar. I know that the process of thermically stripping car body parts is not new. It is getting used more and more often now though, because the control over the process has grown, meaning that body parts aren't harmed in the process anymore. It used to be quite difficult to get the panels out without warpage, but apparently they have overcome that problem. That is quite possibly why it takes 24 hours.

As you will probably know, nobody in carland ever guarantees anything 100%, but everyone is very confident in the process and my body shop guy sweares it will never need attention again! As the parts have all been soaked in the bath and were chrged, the 'paint' supposedly adheres to any spot it can find. Therefore getting into places that sprayguns or brushes could never get. Supposedly, the finish is even capable of sealing slight rust in so good, it won't spread. But, I wouldn't put to much money on that one! So, there is no guarantee that the trunklid will not rust through in a couple of years, but it will have to have been real bad before if it is likely to happen.

My body guy started using it more a year ago and now uses it whenever applicable. He's in the damage repair normally, so replacement is often preferred, but on our kind of cars, this is the best alternative to new sheetmetal, especially if the metal is sound.

In my case, this meant saving all original sheetmetal! The only repro metal you'll find is a rear valance panel and a right quarter (skin, was replaced at least 6 years ago).

Columbo

First time rolling restoration, 66 289 nearing completion.
 

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DO they do this to the entire chassis as well as individual panels?

Tom Kubler, Long-time Mustang Enthusiast & San Antonio Mustang Club Founder
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In my case they only did it to the removable panels, but that is because of the engine and drivetrain still being in the car. Having a solid body enables me to leave the bottom of the car for what it is, and the rest can perfectly be painted this way.

The process can be used on the entire car. The question will be how big is the company who's doing it. Depending on oven and bath size and the capability of raising and lowering a car into them, they may or may not be able to do it. According to my body guy, a Jag was done there completely...

Columbo

First time rolling restoration, 66 289 nearing completion.
 

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Wow! I'm impressed. Is there a name for this baking process? Sounds like your car is in good hands. Once I get my front end and brakes rebuilt I'll be ready for repainting as well. I don't think I'll need to do a complete stipping like you've had done but, who knows. I'd like to find out more about this process if you've got any sources I can search.



EdK (Ed Kennedy on old forum)
'66 Coupe, '94 GT Convertible, 2000 Explorer XLT
 
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