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Judging by all these different experiences you might want to clue us in as to where you plan to settle, next door or across the country. You didn't mention. In some parts of our country the aquifiers are receding pretty badly. Most people are blissfully unaware of it though.
For our grandchildren … what happens when the aquifers dry up and the American Food Basket with it?? I hope the first to go is corn syrup gasoline (aka ethanol). On the plus side, water vapor is a green house gas. Oh well, unintended consequences.....
 

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Clean air, clean water (and/or the ability to clean them), being able to grow or hunt then cook and preserve good food, and the firearms and ammo to keep what is yours WILL NEVER be worthless, and will likely only increase in value when the defecation hits the rotation and oscillation.
 

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This is definitely a case of "Your Mileage May Vary". Wells and septic systems are very dependent on location and current conditions. Well water can be tasty and low in minerals or it can taste awful and be so hard it's impossible to live with. In the latter case, a water treatment system will be necessary which involves more expense and more maintenance. (Of course, it's the same with city water. The tap water in Colorado Springs is as good or better than bottled water. In Stillwater, Oklahoma, where my brother lives, the city water is almost useless untreated. Most people just live with it, but my brother installed a whole house filter and water softener.)

Underground water can and does become contaminated. In an area near my town, the water is contaminated with a firefighting foam chemical from a nearby Air Force Base. Wells can and do go dry. As mentioned, this is becoming more common as big corporation buy and expand farms and ranches. They have the ability to pull more water from aquifers than hundreds of thousands of private homes. When the water is gone, they simply pick up and go elsewhere which isn't easy for local residents.

Some friends of mine lived near Cripple Creek Colorado. Their house was pretty much off the grid; no water, no electrical was available. They were going to buy some land and build, but they very wisely did some research and learned a lot of people in that area tried to do the same and, after many tries, failed to find any water below. Then they were stuck with worthless land nobody would buy. So, my friends found an existing house with a working well, working septic tank and working solar panels which worked far better than I would have expected.

So, I would suggest you do a lot of research for the area where you want to move. Talk to locals. Their knowledge and experience will be invaluable.
 

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Well and septic here, no issues. Great water. I wouldn't let it bother me.
Says the man with no location in his profile nor any other indication what part of the USA he is in.
 

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Underground water can and does become contaminated. In an area near my town, the water is contaminated with a firefighting foam chemical from a nearby Air Force Base. Wells can and do go dry. As mentioned, this is becoming more common as big corporation buy and expand farms and ranches. They have the ability to pull more water from aquifers than hundreds of thousands of private homes. When the water is gone, they simply pick up and go elsewhere which isn't easy for local residents.
Very true. We've had problems with PFC's in the city water and well water in NJ, from firefighting foam and chemical plants, there is many sources. It's a National problem. Luckily my well isn't affected, the city water systems are adding filter systems. Parts of the state are having problems with salt water entering the aquifers, as too much water is drawn out.
 

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I prefer a well over city water ANY DAY but it does matter where you live. My parents well water in Iowa is awful with lots of mineral and sulfur, while our well water here in SW MI is amazing. As mentioned, well water can become contaminated. A number of wells near us are contaminated with PFAS from industrial applications. But keep slashing those environmental regulations, our ground water isn’t important.

We have no problems with our septic.

It’s also nice to not have a water bill.
 

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BK, if moving to upper Wisconsin, I think I would go for a well and a septic. If you're in a city on municipal water, most of them add sodium hexaflouride to the water. Some folks don't mind drinking that, and smelling chlorine, but I would rather drink water as nature intended. LSG
 

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I remember when I was young and helping Dad install carpet and vinyl flooring in a new house. No sidewalks, no grass, muddy drive. Neighbors had mentioned their outside hydrant in case we needed to clean mud off anything. I walked over to use the water, thinking I might get a drink while I was at it. DANG! Turned the water on and the smell of rotten eggs almost made me gag. Turns out they used county water in the house, well had way way too much sulfur to drink.
 

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I remember when I was young and helping Dad install carpet and vinyl flooring in a new house. No sidewalks, no grass, muddy drive. Neighbors had mentioned their outside hydrant in case we needed to clean mud off anything. I walked over to use the water, thinking I might get a drink while I was at it. DANG! Turned the water on and the smell of rotten eggs almost made me gag. Turns out they used county water in the house, well had way way too much sulfur to drink.
I have a minor Sulfur smell, but a Charcoal filter takes care of that.
 
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