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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #1
So what are you guys using and in what order to wet sand and polish. what pads are you using?what compound are you using with them? In what order?
 

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Depends a little on how much orange peel you have. I generally start with 1200, then 1500, 2000. I finish with a 3M Trizact (3000) pad on a DA sander, these are great and get you really close to a polished surface. Then buffing with 3M Perfect-it compound and 3M Hand Glaze. I've become a fan of my Cyclo polisher for the final shine. It takes a little bit longer, but almost no risk of a burn through. The alternative is to switch to a foam pad and use 3M fine machine polish for the final gloss. Just have to be careful with the 1200 and the regular buffer. That's where the burn-throughs happen.
 

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Depends a little on how much orange peel you have. I generally start with 1200, then 1500, 2000. I finish with a 3M Trizact (3000) pad on a DA sander, these are great and get you really close to a polished surface. Then buffing with 3M Perfect-it compound and 3M Hand Glaze. I've become a fan of my Cyclo polisher for the final shine. It takes a little bit longer, but almost no risk of a burn through. The alternative is to switch to a foam pad and use 3M fine machine polish for the final gloss. Just have to be careful with the 1200 and the regular buffer. That's where the burn-throughs happen.
That sounds like a lot of work...no wonder a good paint job isn't only $2k.
 

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As kellysedars mentioned, depends on how much orange peel you have and how awesome of a finish you want. If you really want a super shiny fine flat finish then you may need to start with a hard block with 800 grit paper and work your way through the grits to 2000 or finer. If you have a lot of heavy peel to start and just go with say 1500 grit to start it will be very nice and shiny but the 1500 grit won't cut the peel down much so it will look like a very nice and shiny cellulite thigh. (FLA) If initially planning that route you need to lay an extra coat or two of clear. Typically though most people aren't willing to go that far, just be aware if you have a heavy peel finish you may need to cut those areas with 1000 grit or so first.
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses but I was timing more for the after you wet sand what are you using what pads and compounds!
 

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I have been using a meguiers lately that has diminishing compounds so it starts heavy and finishes finer. Works good and fast for most jobs, then I come back with swirl-x on a 5" orbital. Fast and time efficient. Decent price too. I will look up number when I get out in the shop next.
 

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I would be asking about the wet sanding more, because that's what's going to make or break your polishing.

I go 1200, 1500, 2000, 2500, then Trizact 3000 on orbital polisher. The 3000 doesn't remove 2000 scratches well, the 2500 step in between helps alot, and that's why the grit is made.

For wet sand paper, the best stuff I've found is Meguiar's unigrit.

For pads, I use Lake Country orange for compounding and black for polishing. I get them from Chemical Guys.

For compounds I start with Chemical Guys V32, then go to V34.

For polish I start with Chemical Guys V36 then finish with V38.

I use Chemical Guys pad conditioner to lubricate the pad (a few squirts after adding compound or polish), and Chemical Guys pad cleaner to clean the pad. All of things thing work very effectively and smell AMAZING.

If I'm feeling lazy I'll compound with V32 and then polish with V38. It depends how 'deep' you want your finish to look.

These were some tricks I learned from mentors who make very high end restorations and paint jobs.

Chemical Guys use to have a starter or sample kit of these compounds and polishes that was pretty inexpensive and is enough to do an entire car.

Another thing to be aware of is less compound is more. It only takes a few small drops on the pad. Too much compound and it forms a glaze and you're not cutting.

Also on edges, the buffer pad rotates OFF the edge, not onto it. Hold the buffer at an angle so that the direction of spin is moving off the edge, but on the opposite of the pad, it's raised off the edge so the pad is not spinning back onto the edge, otherwise you'll burn through.
 

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Also on edges, the buffer pad rotates OFF the edge, not onto it. Hold the buffer at an angle so that the direction of spin is moving off the edge, but on the opposite of the pad, it's raised off the edge so the pad is not spinning back onto the edge, otherwise you'll burn through.
I see recommendations to tape the corners during the heavy grits. What say you?
 

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I see recommendations to tape the corners during the heavy grits. What say you?
I'm only speaking for MYSELF because I know my own skill level, so what I do isn't necessarily what may be best for others...but...if there's no adjacent panel. I don't tape an edge or corner. I use the technique I described above (which is how I was taught). If there is an adjacent panel, such as the edge of a door where there's a fender right next to it, I'll buff off the edge of the door. Since the buffer will be buffing ON to the fender, I will tape the fender edge.

But for edges I actually use a little 3" buffing pad that goes on a drill, which allows a lot more control. It also helps to lay a 1 or 2" strip of tape down the edge of a panel and just do your wet sanding up the edge of the tape. Then you don't have to be buffing the very edges of the panels extensively to remove your sanding scratches.
 
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