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Google it. I did this and found a few locations around me.
Troy

I have, but all I get are labs I have to ship my torque wrenches to. I'm just trying figure out if there's an easier option for me.
 
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I have, but all I get are labs I have to ship my torque wrenches to. I'm just trying figure out if there's an easier option for me.
I see from your profile that you are in northern Colorado. If you are anywhere near Denver. you might contact:
Transcat Calibration Services
3251 Lewiston Street Suite 12
Aurora, CO 80011 USA
(888) 969-4805

I found them doing an internet search for "precision tool calibration in Colorado". Their site came up on the first page of results and they do calibrate torque wrenches.
 
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Frankly, I like the old needle type. I figure that so long as the needle is pointing to zero it's within an acceptable range. Others may be more meticulous than I am, but I've never had a failure of a head gasket, for instance.
I assume you mean bending beam type ? They usually have a tolerance of 3%, a little better than the click type. There is another type torque wrench available that I know nothing about, it's called the split beam and are usually more expensive than the click type.
 

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I assume you mean bending beam type ? They usually have a tolerance of 3%, a little better than the click type.
Really depends on the click type. My "go-to" torque wrench is a 25 year old Snap-On QTR2100. It is rated at 3%, but tests better than that.
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I need to buy a torque wrench and am wondering what are some good options “for the money?” I don’t want a piece of junk, but I’m not a professional mechanic using it all day either… suggestions?


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Im a metrology engineer and I work at a calibration lab where torque wrenches are calibrated. If I were you I would decide on the purpose and accuracy needed. See most torque wrenches are designed and calibrated to the tolerances listed in ASME B107 or similar. With this being stated snap-action click type torque wrenches are reported to be good to +_ 4% iv CW and +6% iv CCW. Iv means indicated value. Most beam torque wrench's have a tolerance of + 3% iv in both directions. Those are two most common. MFR’s often meet these requirements or better.

Two things to note about torque wrench reliability. Torque wrenches are more reliable when used in only one direction. Using a torque wrench in two directions is known to have bad reliability. Because of this these wrenches should be calibrated more often. For this reason try to only use your wrenches in one direction. Buy a torque wrench that comes with a cal certificate. If you need one good to 4% ensure that the equipment they used was good to 1% or better.
The second thing to note which is more important is that torque wrenches are only calibrated from 20-100% FS. FS stands for full scale. It’s recommended that you don't use torque wrenches outside of this range. For example if you torque wrench has a 0-250 ft-lb range don’t use the wrench under 50 ft-lbs.

In most cases its not cost effective for individuals to get their tools calibrated. It only takes 5-10 min assuming no adjustments need to be made but its bot free. Since this is the typical case buy a wrench with a tighter tolerance to deal with repeatability issues.

With this being stated I use harbor freight torque wrenches as I can get my tools calibrated often. So far they always pass with no adjustments required. Repeatability isn’t the issue here it’s quality control with initial calibrations or lack there of.
 

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Really depends on the click type. My "go-to" torque wrench is a 25 year old Snap-On QTR2100. It is rated at 3%, but tests better than that.
View attachment 812839
Obviously you wouldn’t want the torque wrench to read exactly at 3% that would be suspect and the reliability would be bad. A proper calibration checks that a wrench meets specific requirements not adjusted to requirements. Note asme b107
 

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I like SK tools SKT0 line of torque wrenches as they are bi-directional wrenches that have the reliability of a uni-directional wrench. They are snap action wrenches aka click type with detachable heads so you can use different drive sizes and can be used on a variety of different jobs. These are expensive tho.

CDI also makes a great line of torque wrenches with many options at a good price.
 

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Can't advise on what to buy, but can DEFINITELY advise on what NOT to buy. Stay away from the cheapies (Harbor Freight etc) as you said in your initial post. You get what you pay for.
A few years ago Hot Rod tested a bunch of torque wrench a few years ago. The HF wrench actually did quite well. It wasn't too far behind the Snap On wrench
 

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A few years ago Hot Rod tested a bunch of torque wrench a few years ago. The HF wrench actually did quite well. It wasn't too far behind the Snap On wrench
Im not sure how you test torque wrenches like this. The thing that really matters is reliability which takes years of data to determine. Additionally this data can be effected by many of issues, such as misuse and bad storage.
 

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I have a few torque wrenches a couple old and a few from Harbor Freight. A few years back I bought one of the digital readout 1/2 inch drive torque wrenches and used this to test the accuracy of each of my ft/lb torque wrenches. Surprisingly, all the torque wrenches matched the digital readout one except for one of the older wrenches. And on that one, I was able to adjust it so that it matched the digital readout. After doing this test, I had more confidence in all of my tested torque wrenches (I couldn't test my inch/lb wrenches).
 

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Alot of the tool trucks have a device on board they use to check your torque wrench for free while you wait-how accurate that is I am not sure, but the Mac fella checked my 35-year-old Vulcan 1/2 inch click style and said it was spot on!
 

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Alot of the tool trucks have a device on board they use to check your torque wrench for free while you wait-how accurate that is I am not sure, but the Mac fella checked my 35-year-old Vulcan 1/2 inch click style and said it was spot on!
I understand thats what they do but it is not a good way to test them. Torque wrenches like a lot of tools have an associated repeatability. Checking that a torque wrench reads with in tolerance makes sense but you really can’t compare them. Without tons of data over a large time frame.
 

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I picked up a couple Craftsman in various drive sizes a few years back and so far they have performed good.

Also, it's generally a good idea to set them back to 0 torque when not in use.
craftsman a few years back is two worlds...one of them today is foreign and i've had two wrenches fail in last few years. really depends on amount of use and price you can afford. i've been using a Husky 200 ft/lb for last two years quite a bit. no issues, looks to be quality build, and a warranty which Craftsman doesn't have...
 

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I’ll keep it short and sweet. Over and over again the “cheap” harbor freight torque wrench has been proven as accurate and good as any expensive brand. Independent tests confirm. As long as you treat it right and turn the torque wrench back to zero for storage, it will be perfect for you. Plus, the return policy at harbor freight is great. I accidentally stored one set to 103 ft lbs for a year or so. Once I realized it I took it back to HF and told them I needed to exchange, no questions asked at all and they told me to go grab a new one off the shelf (which had since been upgraded), been using it for years and it’s perfectly accurate and been great. I think you wouldnt be disappointed in the least with a torque wrench from HF, same with almost everyone on here.

I would imagine anyone on here telling you to stay away from HF torque wrench has either never researched them, never used them, or simply has some sort of weird brand favoritism.
 

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I would imagine anyone on here telling you to stay away from HF torque wrench has either never researched them, never used them, or simply has some sort of weird brand favoritism.
My reasoning is that I work in manufacturing in the US, and prefer to support companies that manufacture - in the US. The CDI torque wrenches I recommend are made here, by our relatives, friends and neighbors. That money goes directly back into our economy, not overseas into another country's, or as profits into the HF owner's pockets.
 
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My reasoning is that I work in manufacturing in the US, and prefer to support companies that manufacture - in the US. The CDI torque wrenches I recommend are made here, by our relatives, friends and neighbors. That money goes directly back into our economy, not overseas into another country's, or as profits into the HF owner's pockets.
This is a great mentality. The issue is that for many of us our pay checks only go so far. I can’t justify spending more money for a tool that will do the same job. Also how often do most VMF members use a torque wrench? 3 times a year… maybe

We often make manufacturing process more difficult to save the environment. Every law that makes manufacturing more difficult, or time consuming raises the cost to produce these goods. Because of this US tools get even more expensive.
 

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I've always stored them correctly. I had a couple craftsman wrenches fail after using them a few years. They were not vintage domestic product. After that saved my pennies. The company I worked for had nothing to do with anything mechanical but the local snap on truck drove past on a regular basis. I spotted him one day at one of his stops. He did not have what I wanted on the truck but agreed to stop by the office one day the next week.

I'm sure it is the only time a snapon truck stopped at the building. I got a few comments/questions from coworkers.

Sorry to say, I'm not sure it's been any more reliable than the craftsman wrenches.
 
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