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Discussion Starter #1
Lady doesn’t know very much about it , says it has 6k miles on it , and all original? Not very much info to go off of clearly it’s not all original but wondering ball park figure on what’s it worth if you can get any ideas off these pictures. Going to go look at it tomorrow. Will post updates . Let me know what you think off the pictures too

Thanks 🙏
 

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Great looking car, but it doesn't look like it's on it's 2nd (6K mile) oil change. Maybe 6K miles since a resto? Value is going to depend on taking a closer look at the car.
 

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Better close up pics help. But IF it had 6k orig miles, I would not expect all the mods done to it.
Look at brake and gas pedals for what type of wear. Note if restored, new replacements not gonna be Ford parts.
Giving us your location in your BIO would help a bit as to what type of wear it might have.
Would think it would have orig FoMOCo hoses, things like that. Not one clue gives good answer, need many.
As for cost, depends of things like real mileage on engine and trans, brakes, interior condion, all options work well like heat.
 

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Decent 67/68 coupes go 12-18k

All condition dependent. I couldn't value a block of gold with those photos. Could be a 7k car, could be a 25k car
 

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As stated, those pics are very tiny and hard to see.
How familiar are you with Mustangs, do you know where to look for the usual rust areas?
 

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Based on the questions you asked, my advice is to walk away from
this car. Contact the local Mustang club, find the experienced old
guys who prefer the old cars, and the spend some time learning
more before you leap.

To answer your main question...

Decent 67/68 coupes with a V8 and no options run about $8K in
my region of the USA. Decent running I6 cars start at about $7K.
Riskier project cars in primer and maybe missing some parts run
$4K to $6K.

As others have stated, your photos are WAY too small for anyone
to evaluate condition and value. I can't even tell the precise year
from your photos.

If the car runs and drives safely and you don't see tons of obvious
rust underneath, then I'd offer $8K. If the seller had photos which
document a full body restoration proving the car isn't full of bondo
over rust, then I'd probably go $10K to $12K tops. But I wouldn't
go much higher because you're quickly heading into "I coulda had
a fastback" territory.

The car in your photos is clearly a resto-mod. It is not original and
has a lot more than 6K miles on it. No Mustangs from this period
except Shelbys came from the factory with stripes. The wheels are
also clearly modern design. The car has a 65/66 steering wheel
installed in a 67/68 car. Can't say I blame them as both the 67
and 68 steering wheels are considered butt ugly by most people.

Cars claiming such low mileage must include service records from
dealerships over the last 40+ years proving the claims are legit.
Otherwise, don't believe it and assume the odometer has rolled
over at least one. In this case, it's obvious the car has typical
mileage over 100K miles.

Finally, owners of resto-mod Mustang coupes typically invest lots
more money in parts than the car is worth. Then they expect to get
their money back when they sell. Unfortunately, it doesn't work
that way. Resto-mod cars are typically much less valuable than
cars restored to original condition. There are many supply-and-
demand reasons for this and I won't get into them now, but it's a
very safe rule of thumb as a buyer.

The one exception to the resto-mod vs original rule are the
commonplace, no option, under-powered I6 Mustangs. These cars
are perfect hot rod candidates because they are the cheapest cars
to buy in stock form, and you probably won't lose your shirt even
after investing in a new drivetrain, brakes, and suspension. Don't
think for a second you can make a profit, but you probably won't
have to sell the car for 50% of what you invested either.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
sorry guys ill try to get better pictures loaded the site for some reason resized them
 

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No export brace or Monte Carlo bar
Bolt on pedal covers
Missing radio
Damage left rear quarter ??
Shackles to compensate for worn leaf springs.
Front end is smashed up
Lower radiator hose on drivers side but extremely restricted, car probably overheats
Passenger door looks dented in on inside at top
Random wire running across floor


Honestly, I would probably pass or offer an extremely low offer, like 4-5 tops, and that's if it runs.
 

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I thought it might look better with bigger photos, but it looks worse. There's no way it has 6000 original miles. The VIN is also very important.
 

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I use Postimage.org for free picture hosting and DO NOT use the thumbnail option so the pictures come out huge. Even so with those small pictures I agree with the others that this car has been around the block more than a few times and evidently has had a fairly long and interesting life. I'd say 206K miles would be more like it, the odometer only reads up to 99,999 and then it rolls over. Little iffy on the price. Look at the body lines and how doors and things actually fit, not how shiny the paint is. I see a LOT of issues.
I'm not saying don't buy it, it depends on what you want. I definitely would like to see a bit lower price though.
 

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The same items that are attracting you To the car are driving me away.

The paint scheme, rims and rubber look pretty cool, but even back in the 80’s, those mods all brought the price down to me. I didn’t want a modded car, I wanted to start with an unmolested car and mod it myself.

How did your inspection go?
 

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Looks like an under $10K car to me based on the pics and probably more like $7500 looking at the engine compartment. Only way I could see anymore in that condition is if it was an S or K code car.
 

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Hopefully this doesn't appear twice. Previous post got internal error. Just to pile on, looks like no heater hoses to interior - is that a bypass hose on engine? Seat backs also look like they were used to pulled on near the tops or maybe just a poor fit for whatever reason. My first impression is that the car looks somewhat beat.
 

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With so much wrong or deceptive about this car, I'd want a
Mustang guru to look it over and verify that the VIN stamp (on
the inner driver-side fender) has the "C", "A", "K", or "S" code
for a V8 car. The interior of your car smacks of a no-option I6
car (a "T" code VIN stamp). If so, then somebody dropped in a
V8 back in the 80s or 90s. There's nothing wrong with that
EXCEPT the entire front and rear suspension must be replaced
when doing a V8 conversion. The front spindles and brakes are
very weak on I6 cars and cannot be used safely with a heavy
V8 installed. The I6 rear differential is also much too weak for a
V8 car. An ignorant high-school kid (or lazy flipper) won't take
the time and expense to replace all those parts. They'll just drive
and sell the car despite the danger.

So as others have stated, I'd keep any offer below $8K for a
common "C" or "A" code car, and around $5K for an "T" code I6
car in this condition. These coupes are not rare or especially
valuable. You can just walk away and find a better car any time.
If this is a genuine ""K" or "S" code car, then the value goes back
up to perhaps $8K to $10K in this condition. The chances are
extremely slim this is a "K" code car. I guarantee you this car
is hiding tons of nightmare rust and bondo and you must factor
this into your offers.

Finally, here is my list of Bad Seller Red Flags...

#1) They don't know anything about the car....except its value
is about the same as a used 2015 Mustang GT because it's a
"Classic". You mentioned the "Lady doesn’t know very much
about it"
and that made me immediately suspicious.

#2) The seller is evasive too often. They never say "Yes" or "No"
when you ask specific questions. Instead, they always respond
with "Not to the best of my knowledge" or "As far as I know it's
okay" and so forth. These are lies. They know the wiring is shot,
the cowl leaks, and the floor pans were repaired with stolen stop
signs and fiberglass. They don't care the car is so dangerous that
Sarah Conner once used it to destroy a Terminator by luring it
into taking a test drive. Yet they won't sell the car for less than
what you can buy a fully restored show car. They want the easy
money.

#3) Is the car titled and/or registered in the seller's name? Or is
the car being sold with an "open" title? If so, then the seller is a
lazy flipper bum asking WAY too much for the car. Flippers sell
about 10 cars each year and avoid all income tax and liability by
keeping their name out of the transaction. Flipper cars are ALWAYS
the worst, over-hyped, over-priced cars. And if the seller looks like
your nice old farmer grandad and is all friendly and home- spun,
then I guarantee you he just got out of Folsom prison and/or
runs the town meth lab and prostitution ring.
 
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