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Discussion Starter #1
Could someone post a picture of what (tool/bits/etc) is used to do the port job?
Thank You
MB
PS...Is this a waste of time if you intend on sticking with regular exhaust manifolds?
 

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Could someone post a picture of what (tool/bits/etc) is used to do the port job?

Search Results for porting - SummitRacing.com

Thank You
MB
PS...Is this a waste of time if you intend on sticking with regular exhaust manifolds?
Most likely. Think of porting/polishing as one of several things you need to open up.
Carb/intake/heads/exhaust
You may open up the heads but your still trying to shove air through a restricted place.
 

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Exhaust port-matching is critical on 289/302 iron heads. The intake side of these is not half bad, but the exhaust side, well, sucks. I have used both a round-head burr cutter, and round head stone, in a die grinder. I have even used an electric die grinder. You can get a pretty inexpensive grinder in hardware stores, such as Sears. I have seen them as cheap as $20. Unless you use it every day, it'll last you 'forever'. Pretty much the same results with stone or cutter. Some folks get nervous about the stone, but since you can do all 8 ports without appreciable wear of the stone, I'd say the chance of getting sand somewhere it doesn't belong is pretty slight.

Check this page out, you'll see how bad the exhaust ports are:

289/302 Cylinder Head Port Matching
 

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I switched back and forth between the cone shaped one and the cylinder shaped one. Be prepared to make a mess. I wore an old long sleeve shirt, gloves, ear plugs, a dusk mask, and of course safety glasses...

bits.jpg
 

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I use a Dremel and a selection of stones. It's a little slow but I like it better than my die grinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies.
....Please bear with me, as I have a couple more questions;

I'll be pulling the engine soon and I'm planning on doing the port job.
Should the heads be removed to do this?
Or can I accomplish this with the engine on the stand?

I appreciate the links,
I need some stuff from McMasters, so I'll prob get a couple from them.
McMaster-Carr

I assume #'s 4197A14 (cylindrical-radius end) & 4197A21 (tree-radius-end) should do the trick.
:thumbsup:
 

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PS...Is this a waste of time if you intend on sticking with regular exhaust manifolds?
Yes. The exhaust side on Fords is very restrictive. Opening up the ports makes a world of difference, however, you're not going to feel a whole lot of gains by trying to stuff all that additional airflow through restrictive cast manifolds. I've seen threads where guys have spent time opening up the manifolds, but you can buy headers for $150 that will give a better return on investment.
 

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Thanks for the replies.
....Please bear with me, as I have a couple more questions;

I'll be pulling the engine soon and I'm planning on doing the port job.
Should the heads be removed to do this?
Or can I accomplish this with the engine on the stand?
I've never done it, I'd rather work on bare heads on the bench but
I've seen it done with the engine on a stand by pulling the valve
covers and backing off all the nuts till the valves are all closed.
You'll need a compressor or good shop vac- preferably both to
make sure no crap is left behind. And you have to assume the
valves are actually closed all the way.....

Yes. The exhaust side on Fords is very restrictive. Opening up the ports makes a world of difference, however, you're not going to feel a whole lot of gains by trying to stuff all that additional airflow through restrictive cast manifolds. I've seen threads where guys have spent time opening up the manifolds, but you can buy headers for $150 that will give a better return on investment.
The only time we ever ported iron exhaust manifolds was on cheater
engines for street racing back in the day. Because extrude-honing
isn't cheap, even an $500 a set, headers are definitely better economy
as far as ultimate flow is concerned.
 

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I just finished this project this past weekend - yes you'll need carbide burrs, some grinding stones, and maybe some sand paper cartridge rolls. I bought a big electric die grinder at Harbor Freight for $25 since I don't have an air compressor big enough to handle hours of an air die grinder. It has a 1/4'' collett for the bigger accessories. I don't think a Dremel would have enough power to do this.

Maybe I had crappy carbide burrs (bought at Ace Hardware) but the grinding stones just mowed through the thermactor bumps much faster than the burrs.

I stuck a shop vac hose right next to the port as I worked. The crap will get everywhere, on you and around the shop. Once I was done I stuck a blow gun in the ports and blew everything into the shop vac. I'm still coughing up this crap!

Maybe 3 hours total in grinding/porting/polishing. I cleaned up the intake ports with just the sanding rolls to smooth everything out a bit.
 

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Just make sure you get EVERYTHING out of the heads. Trap a couple of metal particles under a valve and goodbye motor.
 

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You need to remove the heads. I wouldn't stop at the exhaust side either. This would require pulling the valves. Be sure to put back everything where it came from.

porting tools





Homemade valve spring tools.





Windsor Sr heads before



After



E7 head after.



I also open up the intake ports at the pushrod tube pinch area. Be mindful you don't break through on this.

Once you have removed the valves you may find ridges. These disturb flow. You should smooth these out also. I find it helpfull to work the sides where the bowl transitions in to the port and the short radius.
 

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Better pic of an E7 head.



Don't do this. I nicked the deck. Also, don't nick the valve seat.



Find a cheap head like yours to practice on. You will find your skills improving quickly. The first head won't be as good as the last.

For me, it was easier to work the same portion of each port in a head before moving to the next portion. My porting was more consistent and faster too.

IE, work all the exhaust ports first, then all the exhaust bowls, etc etc. as opposed to completing an entire exhaust then an entire intake.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ocho,
Thanks for the pics, I appreciate them.
Did you only use that 1 bit? Or go through a few of them?
 

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Yes you need to remove the heads and then the valves from the heads...I use a die grinder and stones and yes you need different sized and shaped stones or bits depending on where you are grinding in the port....Get some bits or stones with long shanks on them so you don't hit the valve seats with the collar on the grinder..
 
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