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Discussion Starter #1
New timing cover, inserted my old dipstick had to lightly tap in it..with grease...almost couldn't get it out after it wouldn't seat all the way..ended up cracking the end of the tube, dodged a bullet getting it out in one piece. Purchased a new Scott Drake dipstick tube, looks nice...same fitment issue.


Is it the timing cover holes that are now too small or are the dipstick tubes are too large? I guess they could be being made in China with metric conversion to English units not quite being the same.


Seems like somebody could make a dipstick tube that matches the hole on a timing cover...or a timing cover that has the correct hole size for the dipstick tube.

Thoughts or am I stuck with sanding to fit?
 

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try putting the dipstick tube in the freezer for a couple of days, and then try to install it. it needs to be a tight fit to prevent leaking around the tube.
 

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New timing cover, inserted my old dipstick had to lightly tap in it..with grease...almost couldn't get it out after it wouldn't seat all the way..ended up cracking the end of the tube, dodged a bullet getting it out in one piece. Purchased a new Scott Drake dipstick tube, looks nice...same fitment issue.


Is it the timing cover holes that are now too small or are the dipstick tubes are too large? I guess they could be being made in China with metric conversion to English units not quite being the same.


Seems like somebody could make a dipstick tube that matches the hole on a timing cover...or a timing cover that has the correct hole size for the dipstick tube.

Thoughts or am I stuck with sanding to fit?
Am assuming you are speaking about your '66 Gen. 1 Mustang with a stock T/C cover and you needed a new dipstick tube? ...probably, like what we have all experience, these days...poor quality!
You could hone the opening entrance of the T/C and slip fit the tube. It's just what we have to do these days.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Am assuming you are speaking about your '66 Gen. 1 Mustang with a stock T/C cover and you needed a new dipstick tube? ...probably, like what we have all experience, these days...poor quality!
You could hone the opening entrance of the T/C and slip fit the tube. It's just what we have to do these days.
Yeah you are correct. Example I purchased AFR heads and the corresponding AFR valve cover holes don't line up with the head. AFR are says send back to Summit and get a new set. BS.

I realize it has to be tight but it does have an O ring. I will try sanding and sticking in the freezer as I'm not going to ream out the TC hole as it is already installed on the vehicle with the pan on. Simple things turning my build into a bad time.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ended up taking a file and lightly filing around it until the end of it could be lightly tapped into the TC hole.
 

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Ended up taking a file and lightly filing around it until the end of it could be lightly tapped into the TC hole.
That's what I was going to suggest. Had a similar problem with a replacement cam sensor for the 5.0 in my Mountaineer. Pilot shaft at the bottom was too big for the hole in the block. Spun the shaft with a drill and took off about .002 with a succession of oxide sandpaper. Ran for years after that.
 
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