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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, Im the first to admit I have limited knoledge on engine teardowns. Heres the deal. Everything will be rebuilt.

I have a 351C block with crank/pistons installed. I know I need to keep the caps on the right rods - but what about the rest? Do I have to keep pistons/rods in the right holes?

Also I am disassembling the heads. Do I need to keep and valves, springs etc in order??

Thanks so much!
 

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If you are replacing the pistons, no point. But you should find the rods are numbered.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks 22!

What about disassembly of the heads? I'm basically tearing all this down to get magnafluxed to see what I have to start with. And since I have 2 blocks and 5 heads, I need to have machine shop inspect them and tell me what to use! I figured if I tore em down it would save $$.
 

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Not only are the rods numbered, but there is a specific side of each rod. Getting this correct during reassembly is critical. You can see that one side of the rod is chamfered/beveled more than the other side. This bevel goes against the crankshaft journal.
Rods are numbered, put them back where they came from.
Have rods resized and new rod bolts installed by machine shop while pressing on new pistons.
If swapping cam, replace lifters too.

Don't disassemble heads yourself unless you are planning on port/polishing work yourself. Your machinest will appreciate having all the parts to put it back together again. And they will also be able to inspect everything as they are disassembling to see any unusual wear patterns, etc....

Have you laid out a game plan for this project? A complete stock rebuild? Mild performance rebuild with aftermarket camshaft? Planning on having assembly balanced? Intended use for car and built for that purpose?
 

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Wait! Talk to your Machinist First before you start tearing it apart.
Some will charge more for a pile of parts dropped off vs a complete assy.
Its time consuming to lay out the parts to see what it really needs.

As for the heads, start out with a new set of one piece valves and junk the stock ones.
And I agree with Scott, you need to have a plan on its purpose and what your expecting from it.
This will help matching your parts later.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys. Yea, I really dont have a plan yet. I was just hoping to take all the bare castings in for inspection and have them tell me which are the best ones, look for cracks, etc. Its just that since I have xtra stuff - I need to find the best ones and ditch the rest. I guess I should wait till I get a plan, then attack it.

Its all 351C 4V stuff, I have no idea which way I am going with it tho. I posted before on that so I dont want to rehash that again (C 2V vs C4v vs W).......lol
 

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This might cost you twice. If you are dropping off for machine work, they will do this anyway. But if you go by and have them give the parts the once over to just take back home, you might get a bill.
I remember years ago I did the same thing with a small block chevy. All I knew was the motor I wanted with a 6-71 blower on it. Had no car for the motor until I stumbled across a '73 Z-28 a friend had. I spent a lot of money, and to do it twice, and never really got it right due to throwing in the towel when I met my wife. 22 years later I still regret not making a plan and sticking with it and keeping the car.

But it was a real fun ride, and a learning experience that I think about almost daily.
 

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If you have several sets of 4V heads are they all the same Closed chamber or Open chamber?
The closed chamber heads are more desirable because they make a bit more compression. So that may narrow down which to use. And you can surely sell the others since there is still some demand for them.
Dissasembly will only save you if you do your inspections to determine usable/unusable parts. The best thing is to research what wear to look for, and or post pictures or descriptions of items so you dont take junk to the machine shop.
Once the cores are selected then take those in for machining.
For example, if you pulled old pistons that are marked .030 oversize from your block and you cylinders are now showing deep rust pits or deep scratches then you wil know that block is junk. Since generally .030 over is the max overbore on a cleveland.
Inspect bearings the same way, check the size munbers on them and then check the crank to see if it will tolarate more cutting etc.
 

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Be sure and mark the main caps or put them back in place after removing the crank. If you're not replacing the cam, you also want to mark the lifters to keep them with the lobes they're mated with. The shop will probably suggest it anyway, but if you're mixing parts from the rotating assembly, I'd definitely recommend getting it balanced as well.
 
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