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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep reading through messages about<real deep mocking voice on> "oh, you need at least a 3000 stall"< voice off> etc, etc. What would be the point?? I have a stock converter and I rip the tires to crap with a mild setup. If I were to use a higher stall, wouldnt it just spin the tires MORE? I read that people driving 5 speeds with stock tires and suspension usually launch at about 1k. What is the use of a high stall on the street if you don't have the suspension to put it down??? Am I missing something here? Does a high stall converter do something else besides launch it at a higher rpm than stock? When racing, your not supposed to just gun it off the line, your supposed to baby it to not spin , correct?? That's what somebody on VMF told me a while back. Thanks for clearing this up for me. Im hoping Pistol Pat can lay down the law and set it straight for me! Thanks again for answering. AND yes, I DO infact to research before I come to you with my stupid questions. *sigh*
 

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I believe that it multiplies the torque and gets you in your power band quicker. I ran a 3000 stall in my cleveland car and couldn't even hook in second. It feels like it adds a lot of power but don't.Your stall shouldn't be higher than your cruising RPM anyway, things get hot tranny wise. I took it out and installed a factory unit and was more happy. Yes you want to spin very little if at all (depends on the car). The 5 spd cars also have a numerical gear advantage,usually 3.35 vs 2.4 for a auto.
 

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A high stall is equivalent to having a clutch in an auto, your convertor won't lock up until 3000 which is just like when you use a maual and drop the clutch at 3000. And yes you can't get second gear chirps out because when you do that it is wasting time and losing you ground !!!! So infact a stall and shift kit will out do any manual shifted car all day! Also the stall is designed to slip until 3000 so as to match your peak performance of your cam shaft. It's like having a big cam in a manual and letting out the clutch at 1200 it will bog down it won't perform until you rev it over 3000. This is the same as for a stall, it won't lock up until what ever your stall speed is thus when you hold the car and bring up the rev's in a auto to 3000 and let off the brake it's the same as letting out the clutch on a manual at higher rev's.....You can control wheel spin by not flooring the pedal straight after you stall it......Standard stalls are only good with standard Cams !!!
Ask any drag racer he'll tell you..
 

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I used a high stall (B&M Holeshot) converter on an oldsmobile I built years ago. It made the car not driveable on the street. The motor had to rev way up every time I wanted to go. I took it out and went back with a stock converter and a street cam
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do not agree with a hard line comment that a stock converter is the the way to go.

I do agree that there is a lot of misunderstanding which leads to the bigger is always better mentality.

As I have always looked at it, a change to the torque converter is done for three reasons. The first two are simple; 1.) To allow for an auto trans/radical cam engine. Allows for higher idle speed, which may be necessary with the cam. Without, the car has to be "held back" at stop lights with the brakes. This can be annoying. 2.) To obtain a higher launch rpm. Primarily done for racing reasons.

The third reason is a bit more vague, and actually includes the above as well as comments the other posters have made. To find a balanced combination for the disired effect. Said a little differently, to match the engine, trans, driveline, and suspension for the intended purpose. I suspect that you have discovered that the stock unit matches your setup satisfactory. I also know, however, that there are others where the stock unit totally sucks.

As a side note, a converter is an amazing device. The How Stuff Works web site has a great explanation of how they perform. Also goes into detail on the modern converters which are more complex than the ones of our old Mustangs.
 

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I agree with BT3. The "stall speed" is the point at which the converter becomes so effecient that the engine would stall if you could keep the car stopped to that particular RPM.

I have a B&M 2400 Holeshot converter in my AOD behind the pretty well built 289 in my '66. With the 10:1 pistons, Performer RPM intake, 351W heads, and Lunati cam, my car doesn't make any real power until at least 1500 RPMs. A stock AOD converter has a stall speed of around 1500-1800 RPMs. So if I want to launch hard, I'd need to launch in the power band of 1500+. I would likely stall the engine if I tried to do that with a stock converter.

Launching in the power band doesn't mean you have to spin the tires.

The 2400 stall speed of my converter doesn't make it any less streetable. If I'm not showing a Ricer how a real car goes, I can take offf nice and smooth and quiet, by just taking my foot off the brake and stepping on the gas. The car is my daily driver, and I wouldn't want to drive a daily a car that's a PIA to drive.

If you run a higher stall converter, though, you need to run a seperate cooler for the tranny, as the slippage creates heat that a stock radiator cannot easily handle.

One last point ... the "advertised" stall speed of any converter is just a guideline. A converter with a 2400 stall speed, may actually have a stall of 2200 or 2600 ... it depends on many, many variables.
 
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