Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious guys starting a new build on a 66 for my son's first car. Where do u guys start? Thus particular car is going to need interior done,body work and paint,new wiring harness front to back, gonna run disc brakes at least on the front for now. New grill and hood and a few small things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,022 Posts
I started with disassembling the car down to a rolling chassis and having it media blasted. I'm really glad I did this. Taking the car down to bare metal revealed all the rust. And, yeah, there was a lot of rust!

Sure, you can DA a car down to bare metal on the outside. But media blasting gets into all the corners and crevices you can't get at with a DA.

The primary issues with these cars are rust, rust and RUST! Thus, you must take car of the rust before doing anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Guess it depends on what you want, and how quick you want to be driving it. Personally, I've started a couple project cars, and did the safe route tearing everything down, only to never finish them (especially with the cost of body work). With my Mustang, I decided to go a different route. The body was ok-ish, it has rust, but all the rust is in areas where you can't see. I decided to do the mechanicals first, and get it on the road. Sure, there are plenty of times that I wish I had just stripped it completely down, but then it might be years, or never, that it gets done. With what I have now, I can pretty much unbolt everything and do the body work later if I get the money/time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The body on this car doesn't have any cancerous rust except the floor boards which i am replacing in a few weeks. I was just wondering if it's better to get the paint done then finish the car or do all the other stuff then paint when I'm done. I have about 16 to20 months before the boy gets a license and I have the money to get it done but there's no hurry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
the drivers side is the only floor pan that's bad and it's only from the seat mount forward. I have had the car on a lifT and the rest seems to be really solid. We yanked the seats and carpet out and from the seat mount back is in really good shape.I think the drivers side got it bad due to the rubber grommets under the car covering the bolt holes were missing and it just filled up with water and moisture over the years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I do have a body and paint guy coming over to help with the floor pans if he thinks we need more then by all means we will replace it but I'm not seeing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,341 Posts
It differs based on the particular project, but if I was doing a restoration for a customer it would pretty much be like this....

1. Disassembly to body shell and evaluation of components.

2. Repair of structural sheet metal and epoxy prime.

3. Topcoat of chassis items (engine compartment, core support).

4. Installation of fuel & brake lines, front and rear suspension and brakes.

5. Installation of wiring harnesses.

6. Installation of drivetrain (engine, transmission, driveshaft).

7. Painting of interior (dash, door shell inside, quarter trim (hardtop)

8. Hang doors, hood, deck lid, fenders and adjust.

9. Apply high build, block sand, apply sealer (reduced epoxy primer).

10. Remove doors, hood, deck lid and fenders and paint undersides of hood, deck lid, fenders, outside of cowl, inside of doors from weatherstrip to skin, paint door jambs and inside of A & B pillars and front, rear and side window openings, wheel openings, inside of trunk (wheel houses, inside of quarters, back side of taillight panel, bottom of rocker panel (to about 3" up from pinch weld), roof drip rails, the outer perimeter of the valances, fenders around door opening and at front of fender and rear of quarter panel, and the stone guard with acrylic lacquer.

11. Install glass, front and rear fender extensions, stone guard, valances, roof weatherstrip trip and drip rail moldings, fuel tank, doors, hood, deck lid, fenders and final adjustments. Mask as needed.

12. Apply appropriate color and clear coats in the desired paint system.

Hint: Install emblem barrel clips before paint and stuff with a Q-Tip, cut in half and trimmed to about 1" length to prevent paint from building up inside clip.

13. Install radiator, horns and under-hood accessories.

14. Apply pinch weld blackout, decals, etc.

15. Install interior.

16. Wash, color sand, cut, buff and polish.

17. Install bumpers, emblems, exterior trim, antenna, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Bartl thank you that's kinda what I was looking for that breaks it all down I appreciate the help on that now I have a system I can work with.... thanks for the response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
couple of things you may already be aware of but worth mentioning. From my experience (hobbyist non professional), be wary of the source of the floor pan rust. It usually is the result of either cowl vent rust causing a leak to the floor pan every time it either rains or the car gets washed or a leaking windshield lower corner. If the cowl vent top hat is rusted through at the base this can be a significant job to fix correctly. Laying on the floor and looking up through all the wiring, vent tubes etc behind the dash with a flashlight should tell you what you need to know as far as the top hats is concerned. Also, I am not too sure of the configuration of your 66 as far as torque boxes (some had them some didn't some only had one) anyway, adding torque boxes especially if it is for your son is a good idea. Anything you can do to stiffen up the unibody is a great addition for better handling. For example sub-frame connectors, export brace, monte carlo bars and thicker anti roll bar. These cars didn't corner very well new, and old rusted ones are even worse.

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,276 Posts
Note item 10a. And I prefer to leave small painted items off the car, such as valence panels, because there's a painted flange under the rear one at the top, ditto the front one, and the front bumper is massively easier to install with the panel off. And Ford did it that way, too.

It differs based on the particular project, but if I was doing a restoration for a customer it would pretty much be like this....

1. Disassembly to body shell and evaluation of components.

2. Repair of structural sheet metal and epoxy prime.

3. Topcoat of chassis items (engine compartment, core support).

4. Installation of fuel & brake lines, front and rear suspension and brakes.

5. Installation of wiring harnesses.

6. Installation of drivetrain (engine, transmission, driveshaft).

7. Painting of interior (dash, door shell inside, quarter trim (hardtop)

8. Hang doors, hood, deck lid, fenders and adjust.

9. Apply high build, block sand, apply sealer (reduced epoxy primer).

10. Remove doors, hood, deck lid and fenders and paint undersides of hood, deck lid, fenders, outside of cowl, inside of doors from weatherstrip to skin, paint door jambs and inside of A & B pillars and front, rear and side window openings, wheel openings, inside of trunk (wheel houses, inside of quarters, back side of taillight panel, bottom of rocker panel (to about 3" up from pinch weld), roof drip rails, the outer perimeter of the valances, fenders around door opening and at front of fender and rear of quarter panel, and the stone guard with acrylic lacquer.

10a. Install headliner.

11. Install glass, front and rear fender extensions, stone guard, valances, roof weatherstrip trip and drip rail moldings, fuel tank, doors, hood, deck lid, fenders and final adjustments. Mask as needed.

12. Apply appropriate color and clear coats in the desired paint system.

Hint: Install emblem barrel clips before paint and stuff with a Q-Tip, cut in half and trimmed to about 1" length to prevent paint from building up inside clip.

13. Install radiator, horns and under-hood accessories.

14. Apply pinch weld blackout, decals, etc.

15. Install interior.

16. Wash, color sand, cut, buff and polish.

17. Install bumpers, emblems, exterior trim, antenna, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
My restoration is going a slightly different way than Bartl's in the sense I am getting it running/driveable before tackling everything. My reason is pretty simple, I bought my car out of province and I can't register it until it has a safety and I can't insure it properly unless it is registered which sucks. So step one is get it running and driving so it can be registered insured; I'm pretty sure/hoping they can't fail it due to non structural rust. Once I got all that THEN I'll look into Bartl's list in more detail :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,213 Posts
If you've got a rusty floor and perfect cowl, you'd be the first.
 

·
Registered
1967 Mustang Hardtop
Joined
·
1,718 Posts
Brakes first.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top