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Hey guys,

Those of you that read my "Pride goeth before the Fall" post know that I blew my p/s return hose last week. Thanks to NPD and a little work, I got it replaced with no problems. However, the pump is whining now. I assume it's probably a bit like any hydraulic unit. It really doesn't like to be run without fluid in it /forums/images/icons/frown.gif.

Here's the pump that was on my 289 when I bought the car. It still looks like this except I painted it black during Project More Power .

http://home.earthlink.net/~pirateship/DSC12111.JPG

Anyone know what I can/should replace this with to eliminate the pump squeal? I see several listed for '65s, but this doesn't look like any of the pictures in the catalogs. BTW I used that hi-dollar anti-squeek, stops all leaks, super fluid in it when I filled it back up, if that matters.

Phil

It's not critical, but I just want to start looking around for a new pump in case the whine gets worse. If it's like the hydraulic pumps I've worked around...it will get worse.
 

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What you have there is the power steering pump for use with factory air conditioning. It is a fairly difficult pump to find if you're looking for it. If you no longer have AC, you can replace your pump with the cheaper skinny neck kind. You can also rebuild that pump with a kit. I did mine, and it's very easy. Or you can buy a rebuilt skinny necked pump, and swap the cans on them.
 

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You can rebuild your pump, but if the cam pack inside is scored and damaged (that's what often causes the noises you hear), then a rebuilt kit won't do any good - you may need to replace the cam pack.
You can buy a "skinny" neck pump but be aware that they are not all the same. Your original pump has a short offset pressure fitting and a hole near the outer edge of the can for the support stud to come through. Many skinny neck pumps have a longer centrally located pressure fitting and no hole for the support stud. And since these parts are connected to the pressure canister inside the pump, not just the can, you can't get by by swapping the inards. Make sure the pump you get has the same style fittings in the same locations before you consider swapping cans.
It would be best to have your unit rebuilt by a pro or find another for rebuilding if you can't have your car down for long.
 
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