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Hello I’m getting prepared to repair some spots on my car that need attention. The last owner had car painted and it was not a very good job. I’m not in the position to get the car painted probably for at least a year or so. I would like to take care of these areas and few other small ones around the car as it would make me feel better ?.

I do not have access to an air tank so wondering if I sand down spots like these is there a spray can primer I can get to hot these spots and maybe a matte clear to seal them until I’m able to get a proper paint job?

last picture someone backed into car where the last owner was having it worked on. I knocked out some of the dent from inside the truck and I know I need to get a little more then planned to used filler and get it the best I can for the time being. And yes I know there is filler there already. This will never be a trophy car just want it too look respectable and to be able to enjoy the ride.

Thanks


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Sure can. If you plan on stripping the car in the future use cheap spray. If you are not sanding to bare metal next time around I would use a 2K spray primer like Eastwood. Much more durable IMO.
 

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For sure you an make it look a lot better by yourself. Any paint supplier (my CarQuest mixes paint) can match what you have and fill a rattle can for you. Sanding, primer and a close match will look a lot better. Take your time and it will look great from 5' away.
 

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@cruising68 @Rebel Racing thank you. When the time is right it will be done right, stripped down and issues discovered taken care of. i Only got the car in October and have been spending money on getting it mechanically sound. My oldest daughter just got engaged and honestly a little concerned about the effects the current state of the world will have on my business. Just need to get it looking decent until I’m able to dive in to the next phase
 

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Be careful not to stretch that metal out any more than it is when your pushing the dent out or you will cause more work for the bodyman. Its probably going to need some heat shrinks to repair the stretched metal. You want to push the metal out from the opposite direction that created the dent. Pushing it out without beating on it so hard your creating high spots. Then you go back with a hammer finish with a hammer and dolly being careful not to stretch the metal by hammering to hard. If its pinging when hitting the metal against the dolly your stretching the metal.
You will get it to the point the dent is gone but the metal will be high because it gat stretched. The only way to get rid of that will be to shrink it.

I watch some videos for you. I've seen them where the guys heat the spot and then hammer on it. I took a class from a master metal man and he said why would you want to pound on red hot metal, your just stretching it more. I see guys trying to take dents out with just shrinks. That is not what they are for. They are for after you have brought the metal up and you need to get rid of a stretched spot. This guys video shows him heating dime size spots and quenching them. He's working opposite of what I was taught. First you would have wanted to raise the low spot with a dolly and finish leveling it out with a hammer and dolly. Then if its stretched (bulging upward) would you shrink it from the "high" side. You don't know how stretched the dent is until you have pushed it out. Heat is always the very last resort!

Watch a bunch of videos on metal finishing. Even the paintless dent repair videos have some good lessons. Hammer and dolly techniques and heat shrinking. Just don't go beating out the dent

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Heat no larger than a dime and then quench it.
I use a OOO size tip with 5 lbs of acetylene and 7 lbs. of oxygen.

If you want to try this yourself go find a junk fender and beat some dents into and practice on it first. Something you don't have an emotional attachment to.
 

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Hello I’m getting prepared to repair some spots on my car that need attention. The last owner had car painted and it was not a very good job. I’m not in the position to get the car painted probably for at least a year or so. I would like to take care of these areas and few other small ones around the car as it would make me feel better ?.

I do not have access to an air tank so wondering if I sand down spots like these is there a spray can primer I can get to hot these spots and maybe a matte clear to seal them until I’m able to get a proper paint job?

last picture someone backed into car where the last owner was having it worked on. I knocked out some of the dent from inside the truck and I know I need to get a little more then planned to used filler and get it the best I can for the time being. And yes I know there is filler there already. This will never be a trophy car just want it too look respectable and to be able to enjoy the ride.

Thanks


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I would just use scotch brite on rust lightly, use POR 15 on it wth a brush. The rear use primer like mentioned, and your local parts store that makes paint should be able to mix you a can of paint to match your car. I don't think I would not sand blast if you plan on painting it next year.
 

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I use a stud welder to make a little cherry and then put a wet rag on to quench. You have to be pretty surgical about exactly where to shrink, and you have to be surgical on how to work that dent out for that matter too. That's a big one on a wide open panel...the best advice I can give you is just leave it. Chances are you'll make it worse for your body guy.

Your car is going to need to be stripped completely to bare metal when it's repainted because it looks like there was some awful surface prep.

To fix your spots, sand that rust off, taper the edge of the painted area into the repair area with a fine grit sandpaper (400-600), spray it with a spray can epoxy primer, and then get a color-matched spray can. You could use some spray can clear over it, but I'd have some concern with it leeching under the existing painted surface and attacking that. If you do spray the clear, you can try to buffer it to make it a little shinier. It will definitely look like you repaired it either way, and won't look great until the entire car is repainted.
 

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I would just use scotch brite on rust lightly, use POR 15 on it wth a brush. The rear use primer like mentioned, and your local parts store that makes paint should be able to mix you a can of paint to match your car. I don't think I would not sand blast if you plan on painting it next year.
I would really not recommend this route. The POR is going to be such a PITA later to remove and will look bad as it starts to fade from UV.
 

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I would really not recommend this route. The POR is going to be such a PITA later to remove and will look bad as it starts to fade from UV.
Can use KBS, they make a UV. As far as removing, he will have to sand blast or grind off when doing body work next yr. It does come off.
 

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I'm with @Lizer , get a color matched rattle can or two from your local auto paint store. Sand, treat with a phosphoric acid rust remove solution, prime, fill, seal and paint. Blend it in a little and hit is with a blending clear. Once it's cured, you can cut it with a buffer and it'll look like it has been there since day 1.
 
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I'm with @Lizer , get a color matched rattle can or two from your local auto paint store. Sand, treat with a phosphoric acid rust remove solution, prime, fill, seal and paint. Blend it in a little and hit is with a blending clear. Once it's cured, you can cut it with a buffer and it'll look like it has been there since day 1.
You are right, simply priming the damage will not help. Primer is a lousy protectant, often moisture seeps right through it and corrodes the metal even more.
 

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You need to get rid of the rust or It will keep growing under the primer. The best thing is to mask off the good paint with a couple layers of duct tape to protect. Then use a spot sand blaster on it. I personally have never used one of these. I have a big unit for outside stuff and a large commercial bead blast cabinet inside but I think one of these cheap ones would do what you need. In this video the guy does a terrible job. You need to get every last molecule of rust out of those deep rust pits or the rust is coming back, just like leaving cancer cells in people. Eventually your paint will bubble up over "any" rust you leave behind. It might take ten years but it will happen.

You seed a primer that is a sealer. Some primer like the old lacquer primer surfacer lets moisture go right through it. Whet ever you use for a temporary sealer will need to be removed before you paint the car with the real automotive primer and paint or it could peal off in that spot. Paint it the same because it starts rusting as soon as oxygen hits the bare metal. No short cuts in body and paint works.

 

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Once it's cured, you can cut it with a buffer and it'll look like it has been there since day 1.
Not really. It's still really going to stand out.

To OP, A spray on clear is really low solid content so it can't take much buffer before burn through.
 

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Can use KBS, they make a UV. As far as removing, he will have to sand blast or grind off when doing body work next yr. It does come off.
There's no point to using any of these in the first place, that's what I'm saying.
 

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You need to get every last molecule of rust out of those deep rust pits or the rust is coming back, just like leaving cancer cells in people. Eventually your paint will bubble up over "any" rust you leave behind. It might take ten years but it will happen.

Rust requires iron, oxygen, and water to continue forming. It's not 'contagioius,' It's not going to form from itself if depleted of the reactants needed to form it in the first place. If rust were sealed off in such a way that water and oxygen were inaccessible to it, it will spread no further. The cancer comparison is malarkey that loves to make its way around forums.

As it is, very few products are capable of fully inhibiting water and oxygen penetration, so rust is possible, but not because something was already rusted to start with.

What rust left behind CAN and will do is cause paint failure from poor adhesion.
 

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I've saw it happen on a Model A my Dad restored. 15 year's later the paint bubbled up over a previous rust pit that was not cleaned it was not like lost adhesion there was chip in the paint. It started from behind the paint on a restored car that was sand blasted metal prepped and primed the same day. Painted with professional Ditzler primer and paint. That was before catalyst paint existed. The car was kept garaged under a car cover in SoCal. It never saw water after it was painted. Was driven less them 100 miles Only dusted with an Ostridge feather duster which was what restorers used at the time. Th blister appeared several inches from the edge of the col section. The metal was solid with no pin holes going clean through where moisture and oxygen could get in from behind. If he left a rust pit I can't imagine it was any bogger than a grain of sand. Dad told me he had not gotten the rust completely out of some pits in that spot. Maybe the paints at the time were not as good sealer as they are now. After that experience I have been paranoid of painting over rust pits. I understand the concept of iron oxide being formed from the iron coming in contact with oxygen, its a chemical reaction.

Corrosion Creepback

Corrosion creepback – Advice on paint defects | Glasurit
 

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This is all I ever use on my truck. Has kept rust at bay for 5 years now. No intention of painting
 

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Not really. It's still really going to stand out.

To OP, A spray on clear is really low solid content so it can't take much buffer before burn through.
Yes, you have to be careful, and the match won't be exact, but it'll look a far sight better than the suggestion of using POR15 .... ;)

My long lost '71 Cougar XR-7 was painted Light Gold from the factory, an exact match for Rustoleum Appliance Almond.
 
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Yes, you have to be careful, and the match won't be exact, but it'll look a far sight better than the suggestion of using POR15 .... ;)

My long lost '71 Cougar XR-7 was painted Light Gold from the factory, an exact match for Rustoleum Appliance Almond.
You can paint over POR 15. POR 15 is just to stop the rust until it gets painted the correct way next yr.
 
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