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So I've an opportunity to but a clean 66 A code fastback. 15 year old restoration. Not original colour. 4 speed with a 3.5 track lock diff. No aircon or power steering but original 4 piston disk and supposedly original eng and trans. It's been tricked up a bit new intake manifold and carb and has a mild cam and extractors. Paint is good at 20 feet and some bubbling on hood and top of fenders and interior is old but respectable.

I suspect its had a bit of a boy racer tweak but overall body and running gear is solid. I'm in the UK so presume $2k shipping and $3k duty. Asking price is $30k.

It's a daily driver from what I can see..

Is $30k fair ask in today's market?

Greatly appreciate some advice.

Thanks Aussie Pete (UK)
 

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It's worth what you're willing to pay, but I wouldn't pay 30k for a largely modified 55 year old car. Pictures might help.
 

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It may have started life as an A code 66. Now it's a restomod 66. With all the modifications you might have issues that wouldn't have been on a straight restoration. As a daily driver I'd say the asking price is probably what has been invested in it and probably twice the true value of the car.
 

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I’m going to disagree with my friends above and say the price doesn’t seem too out of line. Certainly not double. Pictures would be very helpful in assessing value. Any clean, rust-free fastback is worth that or close to it. Good luck!
 

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What it is worth depends on its condition and quality.

If the body is solid, rust and damage free and original maybe $30k is close.

If the body is full of bondo with badly fitted replacement quarters and patched floors it is grossly high.

My experience is that most are of fairly low quality workmanship :(
 

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I would not spend that kind of money without looking closely at it so you know exactly what you are buying.You really have to look and see what the issues are. Bubbling paint is not good and means RUST. I would post pictures of everything if you want accurate guestimates.
 

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If that commands $30k then mine's going up for sale tomorrow!
 

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I agree with Woodchuck. That would upgrade the value of my restored 66 coupe (minus it's paint job) to about $25K (it's posted in the Build forum here under "66 bucket coupe").
 

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I'm in the UK so presume $2k shipping and $3k duty. Asking price is $30k.
Price always depends on condition. You may have found a good deal, and it may be a total ripoff.

Warning! The worst scam horror stories are classic cars shipped overseas to a buyer who DIDN'T inspect the car in person. The most amoral sellers in the USA are looking for overseas buyers. We're talking outright lies in the description, bondo over rust, rattle-can paint, and so forth. The car is gorgeous in the web photos, but in person you learn that it's actually a death-trap which needs a new cowl, rockers, frame rails, driver-train, brakes etc.

If your budget allows $35K US dollars ($29K £ at the moment) then I'd would either...

#1) Buy a solid restoration project for the least amount possible and have it restored in the US by @rusty428cj in Florida. Then ship the finished car back to the UK. I'm not sure how much shops charge in the UK, but I suspect Rusty would be a LOT less expensive than having it restored in the UK. Now that I think about it, I'd give Rusty a down-payment, and let him pick out the project car and handle all the details. His shop does excellent work. Look up his build threads here in the forum.

#2) Be patient and find a photo-documented, well-restored, honest car from a Mustang collector. Follow the most reputable auction sites like Mecum. The car will be solid and ready to go without any work needed.

#3) Avoid classic car "dealers" at all costs! These dealers do NOT guarantee the car's description is valid. They are just middle-men who "broker" deals between a crook (the seller) and suckers (the buyer). Their cars are always WAY overpriced for the actual condition. When the buyer finds out he was ripped off, his only action is suing the previous owner. That would be double-fun when the plaintiff is overseas.

In case #1 and #2, you'll pay more up front, but you'll save money long term. If you're not an expert on early Mustangs, then I wouldn't risk it. The worst scenario is spending $35K for a car that's only worth $15K.

I hope this helps.
 

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^^^^ what he said. The ongoing pain of a hidden bondo/rusty death trap is FAR more than the temporary pain of a higher initial outlay which yields a safe, nice looking driver of a car that's properly done right. Especially so when overseas shipping, off shore "can't see it for myself" situations are present.
 

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I'm in agreement with most of the above. Putting myself in your place I'd be terrified. If you could find an experienced Mustang restorer such as on this forum who lives reasonably close and willing to check it out, pay him to inspect it. If not there are professional appraisers you can contract to look it over. There's no 100% guarantee but a whole lot better than losing that kind of money.
 
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