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Discussion Starter #1
This is an update to my post about the relative differences between chrome-moly, plasma-moly and
ductile iron rings.

I spoke with one of the guys at Total Seal and got some really good information. My cylinder
walls had been honed to a 500 grit finish, which Total Seal says is much too fine for a street
application. He recommended a 280 grit finish for chrome-moly or plasma-moly rings ( the
Total Seal kit is plasma-moly). I explained that I didn't want to have to haul the block back
to my machinist to regrind the cylinders. So Total Seal suggested I get hold of a 180 grit
flex-hone and run that through each cylinder 6-10 times. This would give me the 280 grit
finish I need for the performance rings.

So now I'm looking for a 180 grit 105mm flex-hone. But I haven't found anyplace around
here who can/will rent me one. So now I need to buy one. Do any of you machinst types
know where I can order one. The Flex-Hone website suggests a price of $65 (which is
still cheaper in $ and time than a repeat trip to my machine shop would be).

Any pointers?

Rich
'67 C-code 'vert (Dees67)
'69 GT FB (project car)
Check out my band: Brickyard Blues
 

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Any decent auto parts store should have a generic "bottle brush" hone for about $25-30.

Total Seal actualy recomended one? I don't use these for several reasons. I guess if the cylinders have already been bored or honed with a stone it wouldnt make a big difference .........

Hal
Love hard, drive fast, wear your seat belt.

PS, that's my 'bird...... My Mustang is too ugly to take pictures of yet........*G*.

http://www.teleport.com/~cosa/bird2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, given that the cylinders were already honed fine (500 grit), the ball hone was suggested
as a means to get back to a slightly coarser finish so as to allow the performance rings to seat
in a reasonable time span. In fact, the fellow I spoke to said he was doing this very operation
with a friend over the weekend for the same reason (too fine a finish from the machine shop).

His point was that the ball hone would not be too hard on the walls, since they don't load down
on the wall the way a Sunnen hone would.

As for auto parts places, I want to be certain I'm getting what I need (180 grit hone), and some of
the puppies that are working at these places make me a bit nervous as far as trusting their
knowledge of specialty tools.

Rich
'67 C-code 'vert (Dees67)
'69 GT FB (project car)
Check out my band: Brickyard Blues
 
G

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I know what you mean about trusting the local parts counter help.
I always ask to see the catalog for myself if I have any doubts.
The most common grit of generic hones is 120grit
65.00 is not too bad a figure for a quality hone

Greg B
 
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