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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a 4 blade fan with the correct shroud on my 289 and the other night while in the take out line at the local ice cream spot I experienced an over heating situation to the point where the car stalled.
I got it going again but had to jump out of the line up and go for a drive to cool it down. It was about 80 deg.
and I was in line for about 10 minutes. The A/F meter went to a hard bottom (10) and she stalled.

Can I get significantly more cooling from a 5 or 6 blade fan ?

Rad is a factory style that was recently re-cored, water pump was new with the rebuild.
I'm concerned now that if I get stuck in traffic , I'm gonna have a bigger problem...
 

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1966 Mustang Hardtop 289 4 Speed
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I have a stock style clutch fan and no over temp issues. I've been in drive thru lanes, no issues. But Im also using an ACP aluminum rad. Btw, I haven't noticed spell check on this forum in the past. I kept getting overtime every time I tried to type overtemp.
 

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1966 Mustang Coupe, 289
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I’ve got a 66 with a 289, I can’t say that it’s stock since the 289 isn’t either but I’ve got a 6 blade fan in mine. With my stock style radiator and water pump, she’ll get pretty hot if I idle too long. My next move is an aluminum radiator. I can’t speak on the performance of a 4 blade vs. 6 blade but I the issue can still exist with a 6 and a new radiator may be a better route.
 

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I think ( have to go look) a 66 with factory AC had either a 5 or 6 blade clutch fan, stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I look at the NPD catalog I don't see any clutch fans listed
Just 4,5 and 6 blade types
I would like to keep the stock rad look so changing the fan is my first option at this point i think
 

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This is what I put on mine earlier this year,


And

I believe the part numbers are Hayden 2710 for the clutch and Derale 17117 for the fan if you want to search other vendors.
 

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How far is the fan in the shroud? Can you post a picture? If the fan is too deep in the shroud or too far out it is not as efficient as it can be. What thermostat are you running?
 

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How far is the fan in the shroud? Can you post a picture? If the fan is too deep in the shroud or too far out it is not as efficient as it can be. What thermostat are you running?
About half way in the shroud. Solid steel fans use a surprising amount of HP to turn as the RPMs climb. Clutch fans will reduce HP used by a steel fan. I second the water wetter and distilled water. Some rust inhibitor also would be a good way to go.
 

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I have read thread after thread after thread on VMF and other sites about cooling these cars, and in stock or mildly modified applications I can't see that aluminum really makes any difference over brass / copper radiators, when total cooling surface area and flow are truly comparable. I think where people see the real remedy to their cooling problems it is with 1) a clean system including the block, pump, heater core and radiator, 2) a healthy pump, pressure cap, and thermostat of the correct opening temp that does so when it should, 3) a proper coolant ratio of 50/50 or 60/40 distilled water and coolant and 4) moving enough air through the radiator core...and when someone says this magic new (and totally clean) radiator did the trick for them, it's usually because they flushed and filled their system with a good mix and either had or installed a good thermostat and cap along the way. Maybe making a change to a clutch style fan and a 5, 6, even a 7 blade fan will move more air for any of us (I run a clutch and 7 here in hot & humid Alabama) it won't help for long if your system just needs a good cleaning or another component replaced. New fan? New clutch? New rad? Maybe. Good luck, all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@zray is your waterwetter comments based on your personal experience ?
I've been reading that a 50/50 antifreeze is as good in a street application? (which is what I currently have )
If I could get 10-15 degrees I would certainly try it !

I think i'm gonna go with the clutch fan as well.
Is 6 blades better than 5 ?
Will I need to use a different spacer ?
 

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Water wetter works. Ran it for years when I was racing off-road motorcycles. Gives you the best heat transfer. Never ran it in my Mustang so can’t offer much there, however, I think I would rather run at least some antifreeze for some corrosion and boil protection. If you are close I agree the change to water wetter would help.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Between the fresh re-core and the newer water pump, makes me wonder if you don't have something else going on? Maybe exhaust blockage, or running too lean?

A more modern fan will most likely move more air - but it's frustrating they don't have CFM ratings the same way all of the electric fans do so you can compare. The number of blades isn't as important as the aggressiveness of the pitch of the blades. Something like a flex blade fan with the big curved metal blades tends to have the best airflow at idle.

I'm a mechanical engineer, so I'm classically trained for heat exchange. The main problem is you're getting the least airflow when you need to generate the most - at idle. You can help yourself some just by giving it a little gas and running up between 1,000-1,500 RPM - this will get your fan spinning faster and moving more air and also circulate your coolant a little better. I have a 1914 Model T and this is commonly used trick to get better airflow when not moving much. From a pure performance perspective - the BEST thing you can do is get an electric fan. That's going to give you awesome airflow when you need it most. Totally understandable if you are more purist and prefer a mechanical fan, but I'm a fan rimshot of electric ones - free up some HP and stay cool when you need it.

 

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@zray is your waterwetter comments based on your personal experience ?
I've been reading that a 50/50 antifreeze is as good in a street application? (which is what I currently have )
If I could get 10-15 degrees I would certainly try it ......”
Yes 100% based on personal experience. Aside from my own vehicles, and my part time restoration work for others, I used to work in a restoration shop.
This afforded me numerous opportunities to deal with overheating issues.

WaterWetter will absolutely help with heat transfer.
In most cases of overheating I prefer to start where the heat is being produced, then work outward:

1) flush the block out. if you’ve got a block that has debris or is coated with any kind of film, the heat transfer will be degraded and all other fixes will be ineffective. There are citrus based flushing products that really help to get the block clean, but even flushing with water will help.

Here’s a product that will loosen up scale and rust:

RMI-25 Cooling System Treatment Quart Amazon.com: RMI-25 Cooling System Treatment Quart: Automotive

Prestone also sells a block flushing product

In your case , after the block is clean, I’d fill with distilled water and WaterWetter. The WaterWetter has enough lubricants to satisfy the needs of the water pump .

2) get the clutch fan with a shroud

These two steps should translate into a substantial improvement in cooling system efficiency.

After the block is clean, a Tefba filter works very well to keep it that way. I’ve used them several times and prefer them over the Gano filter, et al.


AeroFlow makes an aluminum version of it, I never tried it but it looks nice:


Z
 

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@WreckRod is exactly right (welcome BTW). Nothing moves as much air at low engine RPM as an electric fan.

A clutch fan is a fine setup but the purpose of the clutch is to cool LESS than installing whatever fan is attached to the clutch in a fixed manner. The only time it approaches equal to attaching the fan fixed is when it is 100% locked up (ie acting as fixed), but there is probably still a bit of loss of efficiency due to the large frontal area of the clutch that could restrict some flow vs not having that. It's benefits are: 1.) it saves some power by not moving air at 100% capacity all the time and 2.) by allowing a car to reach operating temperature more quickly, that's it.

Darn near any fan should keep the car from overheating at 80 degrees air temp. I would flush the system and make sure the thermostat is not stuck, or installed backwards. When flushing use a filter (piece of women's nylons work) to keep crap from contaminating your freshly cored radiator.
 

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Don’t go electric…wrong rabbit hole….
 

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I have used the Redline water wetter. Yeah, it really helps. But it may not solve all your cooling problems.

I installed a 20" 4-core radiator and 6-blade clutch fan in my 1970 Mach 1 with a Cleveland. When the car is moving, the engine runs cold or right at 180. But at idle, the fan just can't pull enough air across all 4-cores. I think part of the problem is the thicker radiator pushes the shroud back which places the fan almost completely inside the shroud. (Optimally, the fan blades should be half way into the shroud.)

Anyway, I've been talking to West Coast Classic Cougar about this issue. That guy really has the right idea about using factory-style solutions to keep our classic Fords cool. As he explains in the video, we're dealing with more challenges these days than drivers in the 1960s.

I tried the 7-blade Cobra Jet fan and clutch from WCCC. It works WAY better than the 6-blade fan. But the temp still slowly creeps up at idle. So, just yesterday I sucked it up and ordered the 24" 3-core radiator and shroud as well.

Unfortunately, you can't install a 24" radiator in a 1965 Mustang without some serious fabrication. So, I suggest you go to the WCCC web site, bring up a chat session and explain the situation. Dollars to doughnuts, he'll have a very good cooling solution that will bolt right into your car. His prices may not be the cheapest, but they are reasonable and he's very good at helping you select exactly the right parts. He's also a really great dude and I like supporting his business.

Good luck and have fun!
 

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Don’t go electric…wrong rabbit hole….
Changing the fan at all is probably the wrong rabbit hole.

I have an electric and other than sounding like a swarm of bees, it works fine. To your point, it does lead to a number of other changes.
 
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