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Dimples
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It’s a simple and simultaneously complicated question.

Why a classic Mustang?

It could be so many things. I dream of a 61-63 Thunderbird. I would love a Corvette. I want a 49-51 Shoebox Ford.

Almost 30 years of driving later, I picked a classic Mustang for my first car and then again a few years later as my forever fun car.

Why?

I have thoughts, but I’m interested in yours.
 

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My saga with 65 mustangs started with my granny who had a little red v8 coupe. She used to take me all over the place in it because she took care of me a lot. She would ask me if I wanted to throw gravel which was, of course, always yes and she would sling gravel when she took off. It is still in the family all these years later. One of my nieces whose husband is a mechanic was willed it and they have restored it.
 

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Well, I wish I had some survivor story or that this was my grandfathers Mustang, but I don't. I chose the Mustang as I really like the styling, it is relatively "cheap" to restore, and honestly this is my practice car before I do a C3 Corvette and replica Cobra.

I will say that I have developed quite a passion for Mustangs though. Now that I have gone to such depth on this Mustang project, the Cobra will be a piece of cake. Heck, you start with everything new with that kit. I kinda morbidly liked tearing down the old though, so the Cobra has fallen down the list.
 

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i fell in love with the first gen mustangs way back in 1970 after reading a couple of articles in popular hot rodding where they took an old mustang and hopped it up cheaply. it supplanted my first favorite car, the datsun 240z.
 

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So many reasons:
  • It was my first car
  • They aren't expensive to get into
  • They aren't expensive to maintain
  • Parts availability
  • Gorgeous styling
  • Cool factor
Fifteen years ago I was in need of a pickup so I bought a '58 Chevy. It met all of the points above except it wasn't my first vehicle. It was great, but not practical enough. It was too pretty to treat like a truck and top speed was 45 mph (granny gear, pure stock.)

The mustang is practical.
 

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I was 10 years old and my brother's Godfather rolled up to our house in a Red 1965 Convertible Mustang with White stripes and with white interior. It was the most beautiful car I had ever seen. It was super clean and all the chrome shining in the sun and that low deep rumble of that V8. I thought I want a car just like that when I grow up. I always asked about that car and found out he eventually sold it and lost track of it. Reason I drive a 67 Convertible but still remember that 65.
 

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My first car was a 66 coupe.
Bought it for $1500 At age 15.
Spent every hour, and every dollar until I was 22 rebuilding it and drag racing it.

I love hot rods and muscle cars and mustang has my heart.

I’m a piddler, I need something to obsess over. I need hobbies.
Can’t sit still. Chasing it all down, the research, the work. I love it.

For years and years I tried to find my original 66.
I said I would always have a mustang again.

I’m having a blast!!!!
Meeting great new people.
Really enjoying it.

Mike
My first 66, back in 1988.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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My 1st was a 65 GT convert. It was basically my main car and I put 91,000+ on it in 3 years, before it was wrecked by an unlicensed, uninsured moron. 2nd was a 65 K GT convert- awesome fun to drive and I put around 10K/ year on it until I stupidly sold it! My current one is a 64 convert- 4th in the line and I've done over 400,000 miles in it. 44 states, Canada & Mexico. For years, it too was an "only" car. I have been extremely lucky and also have a 65 K GT FB- drive it as much as I can, a 69 GT convert- 15,000+ until it needed a new motor. Currently is being repaired as needed to get it back on the road. This one drive like a Lincoln. I also have a 16 GT convert Outlaw #13. That has over 53K on it in just over 3 years. As much fun as the 16 is, with all the toys and power, I still prefer the 64. There's just something about the older ones that just has a certain feeling about it when you're going down the road with not a care at all! And since I've always wanted one, I bought a 57 T-Bird for myself last summer. I plan on driving the wheels off of this one as well!
 

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I can remember being a small child in the 70s, seeing what I called a "Muttang" and always loving them. They were plentiful and there was just something about them. Our fiberglass bathtub at home had a side sculpture that was remarkably close to that of a 64-66 body and I would pretend to drive one at bath time. My brother had (and still does) an original AMF Mustang pedal car and when he outgrew it, I'm sure I put a million miles on it in the garage, driveway and yard. Around 12, maybe 13, I got really interested in my Dad's "Motors" and " Chilton" books and they had tons of info and pictures, including the grilles of cars for year by year identification. And that 65 and 66 Mustang grille still got me. I started looking at Mustang & Fords and Mustang Illustrated, and learned all I could. I had a cousin that was selling a grey 65 or 66, I looked at it when I was about 14 and remember thinking, "What a rag!" He had even painted the engine Chevy Orange. When I was 15, my next door neighbor, one year older, got a gorgeous 1966 hardtop. It was Vintage Burgundy with a Parchment Deluxe Interior, console, AC, power steering, wire wheel covers and the sweetest dual exhaust... It tortured me when he would fire that beauty up and drive right by me as I waited for the school bus to go to the very same school. He never offered a ride. My parents had split and remarried...Mom came home one day and her husband said he had seen a funny-colored old Mustang in town, driven by an old man, and he had a For Sale sign with a phone number in the rear window. I called the number and remember the excitement of learning it was only a couple of miles away. In February of 1992 we drove to an older gentleman's home, and when I saw it...Tahoe Turquoise... I KNEW. This was IT. It HAD to be. MY...FIRST...CAR. The gentleman, I'll just call him Don, actually had TWO. The other was a 200-6 Convertible in Vintage Burgundy with Parchment Deluxe Interior and power top, AC, console and power steering. But that Tahoe Turquoise car was GoRgEoUs and had the 289 V8, automatic and was in his words "the most solid Mustang of all the dozens he had owned." Dozens. And I just wanted ONE. I must have driven my parents crazy playing the middleman and talking about that car for a couple of days and somehow, they AGREED for once to help me buy the car. And on February 5th, 1992, my grandmother drove me after work back to Don's house with a check. Thanks, Don, for caring about old cars and knowing when and when not to "restore". I have owned MyFirstCar ever since. And I can revisit the most trying, thrilling, mournful and magical times of my life just by going out to my driveway and getting inside. I have driven to high school, college, the police academy, my marriage, births and funerals, street races and parades, car shows and errands in my old car. And I'm passing on the love in an Emberglo 66 hardtop and a Nightmist 66 hardtop to my two sons. Now, I've had 6 of them and own 3 that will likely never be sold. Very few people have their dream car as their first car, and even fewer have their first car as their last car, too. It has been a conversation starter thoudands of times, and I love to share it. I'm 16 every time I go for a drive, even if only in my mind.
 

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It’s a simple and simultaneously complicated question.

Why a classic Mustang?
Five reasons:

(1) Some cars are iconic. They represent an idea, a point in history, a generation. The 1957 Chevy BelAir, the VW Beetle, etc... and the Mustang all fit into that category. Specifically, the Mustang blends the idea of the P51 mustang of WWII *and* the wild Mustang horse of the American West. Also, it is *the* representative car of the '60's. Plus...

(2) Unlike some of the other iconic cars, the Mustang is actually beautifully styled. I mean I like '57 Chevys, VW's, etc but really they are not in themselves particularly beautiful (IMO).

(3) Getting into classic Mustangs is still tractable (economically). I mean there were so many made you can still buy them at reasonable prices. Parts are available and reasonably priced. They are easy to work on and you can find lots of support when you run into problems (eg VMF).

(4) Because of all the different variations, the mustang community is very broad. You go all the way from 6-banger coupes to Concours Shelbys. I like the fact that a wide group of people can be involved in the hobby - from teenagers to millionaires.

(5) Finally, even though these cars are ~50yrs old, with some safety mods and a bit of defensive driving they are still perfectly roadworthy as a daily driver. Try that with a Model-T, etc.
 

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My decision was purely practical.

I wanted to learn how to work on and restore a classic car/truck. I wanted to find one that had plenty of parts available and a large community of passionate people to rely on. With these criteria, the choice was pretty easy.
 

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Oh wow, I guess it's the first time I ever really thought about it. I remember being in middle school, walking to and from school, (yes, 5 miles, uphill both ways) and walking past a body shop with a 69 mach 1 in the yard and staring at it as I walked past every day. It was orange with a flat black hood and I remember looking at and falling in love with those sleek lines, but being 12 or so years old, knowing there was no way I could ever have it, but i always kept it in mind.

Around here is Chevy country and the mustang sitting lonely in a body shop yard seemed very exotic to 12 year old me. Don't get me wrong, I like me a nice old chevelle, or Camaro, or super bee, or charger, or firebird, but a mustang was something special and rarely seen around here.

Later in high school, my best friend had a rusty old blue 72 fastback with orange front fenders and a hopped up 302 and I don't think I could have been more jealous. ( I was driving a 69 jeep gladiator with a 350 Buick engine that I sincerely wish I had back).

After high school, I found a job and one day my mother told me that she saw an old mustang for sale near me. I went and looked at a 65 Wimbledon white mustang with a red interior, 289, 3 speed manual and wound up buying it for the princely sum of $1600 ( in 1984). I guess that began my mustang addiction because I haven't been without one since.
 

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Because I couldn't afford a 68 Charger R/T 440 Magnum... :nerd:>:)

The Mustang has been in the family for a few decades and prior to that it was in the family of a high school friend of my dad's. He got it when he bought the house and everything in it in an estate sale. It was my turn to get it going and drive it.
 

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1) Raging case of Mid-Life crisis - needed cure
2) Was tracking a Triumph TR6 and getting fast, doors were creaking in turn 1 at Sears Point, cost to build a trackable car would not fix #1) above - wanted a hardtop for stiffness and protection

3) Wanted to build a performance muscle car CHEAP
4) Huge aftermarket - cheap parts for a windsor
5) Right size, right look, right price
6) Found my car and fell in love...
 

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I can't explain it. I was just born that way. When I was about 3 or 4, we lived in a small town in Virginia. I was fascinated with our next door neighbor's car. I didn't know what it was, and I never saw anything but the rear while it was parked in their carport. But I remember it was red and shiny and that I really liked it. To this day my Mom remembers what a car nut I was as a baby. Decades later I realized that car was a 65 Mustang fastback, probably "poppy red".
 

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Mostly due to my uncle who worked at a Mustang resto shop in Omaha for years, and has now switched over to a new shop. Some of the cars he had were the coolest thing ever to a young kid/teenager. When I was turning 16 he had a 67 coupe/289 in the shop that he was going to sell me and do a few repairs. I believe the whole thing was going to cost me about $2k! (1995) But my family had to move and I didn't get to work my summer job, so the car fell through. Here I am now 40 and two years into a resto that I thought might take a year and loving life!
 

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Vague memories of standing on the transmission hump between the bucket seats in mom and dad's '65 coupe, I would have been about 4 years old, 1966/67ish.

Growing up and at around the age of 12, our next door neighbor's son had a '68 Meadowlark Yellow fastback, black interior. As a pre-teen that was just getting into cars, it was absolutely the coolest car I'd ever seen and always got my attention when he fired it up and pulled away from the curb (and not always quietly :wink: ) And even more fun when he would take me for a ride.

From then on having a FB was always in the back of my mind. After owning various other "classics" over the next 30+ years, I was finally able to get my never-gonna-get-rid-of-it FB about 7 years ago. Extremely happy to be this car's caretaker that will eventually be passed on to my grandson.


John
 

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