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I'm more concerned with being able to buy high quality replacement parts when the time comes to keep my classic running (instead of it turning into a rolling unreliable aftermarket piece of junk) than value itself going up or down. I'm not going to want to pay anything for an unreliable classic and I wouldn't expect other people to either.
 

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When I go to car shows in the UK, there are always mainly classic cars there and a few modern ones mixed in.

And people are always pleased to see the old cars. And what I really like is seeing young people owning and restoring old cars that were made decades before they were born.

I am seeing no lack of interest here. When I buy fuel, it is normally an event. People making nice comments, coming over to have a quick chat. Even the person on the till in the shop asking about it.

But regarding prices, I have no idea. We had a boom here for E-Type Jaguars in the late 1980s. Prices went insane. Then things settled down again. And I think in recent years or decades, they are on the rise again. Classic cars are like buying shares ( stocks ) and they go up and down all the time.
 

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Maybe we can just make our own new parts with our 3-D printers with a photo app on our mini tablets and home-brew our fuel until we find a suitable hydrogen fuel cell or an electric motor that also simulates the sounds of a solid-lifter V8.
 

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My take is that each generation has a car that hits in their childhood and they modify in their teens/early 20s. Then when that generation gets older and has extra cash, they want to relive their dream car. Each decade of cars has had their heyday and waned. I point to the venerable shoebox Chevies 55-57, 10-15 years ago, they skyrocketted but as their generation is drifts into oblivion, interest in those cars is waning and prices are dropping. Mustangs are going to eventually go the way of the venerable 57 Chevy...
 

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^^^ Bingo. People look to relive their youth. 99% of kids born after 2000 have no memories made with vintage Mustangs.
 

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I'm 34 but I have been blessed with good business choices so I have been able to own multiple classic and a few supercars. I must say it is nice being able to drive in rain, snow, hot, cold, but once the newness wears off there's nothing like a classic..Just the rawness and feeling of the road. I live in Greensboro NC and I will say this when going to the big cars and coffee or other shows it's always the millennials around the imports or what we consider foreign cars. The porsches, lambos, ferraris etc...yes we always have muscle cars but people just pass by them without much attention from what I'm seeing...
I think you misunderstand what is happening in this scenario. These kids are gathering around imports and more modern cars because that is what they can actually buy....you can't(easily) finance a classic car of your choice. So these kids start with something newer...but you will see that as they age they will work their way toward older cars....or at least the ones who actually are car guys instead of it just being an accesory. Its the same reason that I completely ignore Lamborghinis and Ferraris at car shows(unless they happen to be classic versions)...why bother to look at something you will never be able to afford? People seem to want classic mustang value to go up forever....but that is not healthy for the hobby at all...pricing it out of reach of the next generation
 

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These kids are gathering around imports and more modern cars because that is what they can actually buy....
I believe you are wrong. Most car people are drawn to cars they remember from their youth. The cars that gets most interest change slowly with the generations. That's not really something new. :)
 

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** I hate it when this site turns my photos different directions no matter which way I modify or upload them **
Its the phone you are taking it with...for my phone the shutter button MUST be on the right or it loads upside down.
 

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I believe you are wrong. Most car people are drawn to cars they remember from their youth. The cars that gets most interest change slowly with the generations. That's not really something new. :)
If that were true I would be driving an early 80s f150...no. In my experience car guys work their way towards vintage cars....my first car was an 88 Escort GT(2nd was a 67 mustang coupe I drove into the ground). The first car I did any real work to was a 98 Dodge Neon...and that was the newest it got for me...from that point I started working my way back in time. How far back someone goes is dependent on personal preference, but from a car guy perspective there is nothing cooler than vintage steel, whether its domestic or import, stock or modified. The definition of vintage may well move forward though
 

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I think whatever Fast and Furious is driving is going to be the thing for the current generation. That's pretty popular, so those are going to be the cars that they want in 10-20 years.
 

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My take is that each generation has a car that hits in their childhood and they modify in their teens/early 20s. Then when that generation gets older and has extra cash, they want to relive their dream car. Each decade of cars has had their heyday and waned. I point to the venerable shoebox Chevies 55-57, 10-15 years ago, they skyrocketted but as their generation is drifts into oblivion, interest in those cars is waning and prices are dropping. Mustangs are going to eventually go the way of the venerable 57 Chevy...
maybe then I can pick up a clean one and do a Tesla conversion
 

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How far back someone goes is dependent on personal preference....
Yes and the preference for the majority of people have a big connection to their youth. Don't expect people that are 20 years younger than you, to get the same preferences as you have. :)
 

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Yes and the preference for the majority of people have a big connection to their youth. Don't expect people that are 20 years younger than you, to get the same preferences as you have. :)
I guess its a moot point anyway, car culture in general, regardless of the vintage is dying. The wave of the future is self-driving vehicles that allow people to stare at screens the entire way...the interest in cars in general is starting to die out...they are now becoming the equivalent of elevators.
 

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Baby boomers will kill classics

So guys just something that has been on my mind and with me buying and selling restores mustangs it seems the price is coming down or staying the same. So what do you guys think. Will millennials ruin classic car values? Even at the car shows no one is never standing around the classics anymore. It's like they just don't care
No, they won't.

Old guys own classics because they drove them in high school. Watch all the cars pull into a car show before the car show starts. 95% of the owners are older retirees.

Old guys are retiring and eventually they will sell their classic car when they're in their 80's or their family will inherit them only to sell them.

The general population of old cars will devalue except the very rare cars. Classics will come down in price and classic parts suppliers / manufacturers will eventually close their doors, beginning with poorly ran companies such as SSBC.

1960's classics were mostly driven by owner's born in 1940 to 1950.

Do the math...they're entering their 70's. You will see a shift in the next 15-years.
 

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Others have (correctly IMO) pointed out that the market is driven by younger people with bucks, and those kids will get the warm and fuzzies about rice rockets and current domestic muscle cars. There will always be some demand for all classics as people leave their age groups for cars that resonate with them.

What's in favor of vintage Mustangs is that they (along with their contemporaries) are among the last cars that will be easily restored. A modern car today is extraordinarily reliable, but they are also extraordinarily complicated and getting these things running and running correctly will be a big problem 40 years from now.

But I'm absolutely convinced that the coming changeover to electric or other alternative power cars will put a big dent in the gasoline collectible market in general. Some may become more collectible but most others will drop in value in my opinion.

Shoot me if you must, but there may come a time when a well executed electric converted Mustang may bring more money than it's gasoline powered counterpart.

John
 

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Here's hoping! I want to be able to afford a fastback or convertible some day. I'm 35 but was never drawn to what I grew up around (kind of hard to get drawn to a Taurus or Town Car.) As I got older I started liking older vehicles, and eventually got to the point where I wanted an early Mustang. It took me a long time to save up for it, but was extremely happy the day I got the slip. My car isn't done being fixed up but I'm already planning my next classic to build up (mid 60's to early 70's F100.) When I go to the Famous Ford's Forever show here in So Cal I don't even go near the new cars, but only the 1st gen cars (to see what ideas I can steal.) Sure I would like a new GT, since it's much safer with all the idiot drivers out there, but that won't be for some time.
 

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If you dont think the age of the owner has anything to do with it, ask Harley Davidson ;) We boomers are getting old.
I think the reason Mustangs in any condition are priced high today is supply and demand. The Mustang population is dwindling due to age and lack of rust protection from the factory. I had to spend $7500.00 for a basic 6 cyl 3 speed and have already put another $2500.00 into it and I havent even started with paint/bodywork. It took me awhile to find anything under $10K that was restorable. I'll never make money on it. The same car 20 years ago could be bought for $2500-3000.00.
 

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I attend a bunch of local shows here. There is still much enthusiasm from the younger crowd when it comes to the classics. However, they usually all gravitate to the new Challengers, Camaroes, Vettes, and of course Mustangs, when they sow up. My kid who is 24 now loves the old cars but doesn't want to learn how to wrench on them or drive a clutch. My significant other says she is afraid to drive the car - or maybe it's just how I drive it :grin2:. I don't want my ol' 66 Mustang to be left to someone who won't appreciate it or just sell it so I'm going to drive it until I can't then be buried in it! :pirate:
 
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