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Have YOU found any nitrile gloves in stores in the past three months??? :LOL:

Nah, but really, I don't like wearing gloves because I end up ripping them anyways and I do everything by feel so I get kind of messed up when I can't get a good purchase on nuts/bolts/washers. Plus I hate sweaty hands!!! And Dawn dish soap takes care of everything anyways.
Yeah, I get it. I too, many times, find gloves a detriment for tedious work. When I worked in a Gas station in the 70s, we used a product that one lathers on the hands and let it dry. It's creates a protective coating that washes off taking the grease and dirt with it. It was about 98% effective in keeping your nails clean too. I worked in an office environment, as my other day job, thus, couldn't show up looking like a grease monkey LOL. I haven't seen it lately. Fortunately, I several boxes of gloves I get from the VA that are useful, at times.
 

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I don't like to take us off-track here, but, this is a "rear brake' learning comment. A couple years ago, I had my newer DD (Venza) at the dealer for something, I don't recall. The tech comes out to me and stated that my rear pads were severely worn and should be replaced. I though to myself, "yeah bud, another case of up-sell". I stated that that seems unusual, since I've yet to replace the front! I told him I would make a future appointment. He proceeded to tell me, as part of the "anti-dive" characteristics there is more bias to the rear in newer cars. Well, gotta say, my oldest is 53 years young and my newest will be 11 years this August. LOL!
Since there was no low pad squeal yet, I waited another week while my new pads shipped. Sure enough, the rear pads were down pretty low, while the fronts were 50%, maybe a little less. I learned something that day.......
Today’s brake systems are frequently “tweaked” electronically for bias etc.
My Hyundai goes through rear pads literally at the same rate as the fronts. Another factor in pad longevity involves the size. Smaller pad footprint means shorter lifespan.

Just some random musings.

ex-Global West GM
1991-1995
 
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A friend of mine once told me "if it'll go a hundred miles, it'll go a thousand miles". Because I'm insane, I've modified that to be "if it'll go ten miles, it'll go ten thousand miles" which is usually how I approach shakedown runs leading up to road trips. I just can't be bothered to go in circles for a hundred miles to make sure that the car works. As long as cooling is good, motor sounds strong, and transmission isn't doing anything crazy, seems like it should be good for anything, anywhere. I mean, what else does it need???
Less worried about the car itself, mine will make the trip just fine, (knock on wood) but more interested in things related to personal comfort and things you have learned about being comfortable long distance. For instance, I gotta figure out a cup holder ;o)

I've been contemplating this same issue,..."bad master cylinder that actually was not actuating the rears". I have another on on the bench, I'm going re-kit. I run a disc/drum setup with 10X2.5s on the rear. I swear the rears don't seem to get that much wear.
Mine was simple to diagnose, just pull the top off the master and hit the brakes, if it makes a fountain in the fluid, that circuit is shot. A tiny blip at the very beginning of the stroke is ok but anything after that first inch of pedal is no good.

When I worked in a Gas station in the 70s, we used a product that one lathers on the hands and let it dry. It's creates a protective coating that washes off taking the grease and dirt with it. It was about 98% effective in keeping your nails clean too. I worked in an office environment, as my other day job, thus, couldn't show up looking like a grease monkey LOL. I haven't seen it lately. Fortunately, I several boxes of gloves I get from the VA that are useful, at times.
Dish soap works well for that, just put it on your hands and work it into the nail beds and under the nails, then take a paper towl and wipe the excess off and go hit the grease. When you go to wash up, you will be amazed. Can't do it day after day as its tough on the cuticles and seems to take some of the luster out of my manicure ;o))).
 

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Looks good Kelly, originally that is the setup I had before I switched over to their electronic parking brake version. I should have mine back on the road this week to test it out but I love the looks and install was super easy. I’ve had enough drum fade over the years, especially on the country hill roads in the mountains that no matter what anyone tells me discs are better. I’ve also tracked day’d the car several times and the fade would be crazy on esses and back to back hairpins. And really, they look way better as well. Awesome write up, I thought I did a good one and you just crushed it :)
 

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"Mine was simple to diagnose, just pull the top off the master and hit the brakes, if it makes a fountain in the fluid, that circuit is shot. A tiny blip at the very beginning of the stroke is ok but anything after that first inch of pedal is no good."

I'll check this out. Although, I'm a little hesitant as we know what brake fluid does to paint? Perhaps, If I place a cloth over it, like when our "boys" were in diapers and they "went" just about the time you pulled off the diaper LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Yeah, I get it. I too, many times, find gloves a detriment for tedious work. When I worked in a Gas station in the 70s, we used a product that one lathers on the hands and let it dry. It's creates a protective coating that washes off taking the grease and dirt with it. It was about 98% effective in keeping your nails clean too. I worked in an office environment, as my other day job, thus, couldn't show up looking like a grease monkey LOL. I haven't seen it lately. Fortunately, I several boxes of gloves I get from the VA that are useful, at times.
That sounds like an awesome product! It is a little hard to get the super deeply embedded grease out of my hands for my day job. Fortunately I'm a geologist, so I'm expected to always be kinda dirty anyways :p The white limestone dust kind of cancels out the black auto grease... kind of.

Less worried about the car itself, mine will make the trip just fine, (knock on wood) but more interested in things related to personal comfort and things you have learned about being comfortable long distance. For instance, I gotta figure out a cup holder ;o)

Mine was simple to diagnose, just pull the top off the master and hit the brakes, if it makes a fountain in the fluid, that circuit is shot. A tiny blip at the very beginning of the stroke is ok but anything after that first inch of pedal is no good.

Dish soap works well for that, just put it on your hands and work it into the nail beds and under the nails, then take a paper towl and wipe the excess off and go hit the grease. When you go to wash up, you will be amazed. Can't do it day after day as its tough on the cuticles and seems to take some of the luster out of my manicure ;o))).
Oh, for long-distance comfort? Well, that's easy! The two things that I LOVE that I installed are the 1993 Fox Body seats, and the custom center console. The seats are holy moly comfortable - I have no problem sitting in them for 10+ hours without my butt hurting. They're miles better than the stock seats. And the console is essential for the kind of driving I do. I built it with sidesaddle cupholders (which sometimes hold cups, but mostly hold sunscreen and chapstick and various park passes), a storage compartment (holds sunflower seeds, pens, gas receipts, various electronics, batteries), two lighter ports and two USB ports (charges all of my electronics, which is necessary when camping without electricity), and most importantly an arm rest at a perfect height for leaning. Without that, I'd have to put a cardboard box in the footboard of the passenger seat to put all of my stuff in, and it wouldn't be nearly as accessible. When long-hauling, it's important to have music, snacks, and chargers close at hand so your eyes can be on the road at all times. No rummaging in the footwells!

For music, I actually have a little rectangular Bluetooth speaker from Amazon that I put on the dash. Hook up the phone or iPod and let 'er rip - I've found that the sound is a thousand times better than you'd get even if you installed fancy surround sound speakers in various places in our cars. I've got the standard dash and kick panel speakers and they don't do anything for me at highway speeds with the windows down - the sound clarity is just not there. With the little dash speaker, I can just point it at my face and hear everything perfectly, and it cost like 10 bucks.
 

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Less worried about the car itself, mine will make the trip just fine, (knock on wood) but more interested in things related to personal comfort and things you have learned about being comfortable long distance. For instance, I gotta figure out a cup holder ;o)
I found a nice cup holder/phone holder that fits between seat and console, and goes in the back when I'm at shows and not needing it. Found it, and several others like it at that Amazon place.
 
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