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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So in my search to figure out why my (mislabeled 351) oil pan didn't fit my 302 engine, I came across something I had never heard of before - windage trays. I guess I've lived a sheltered life. Has anybody here put one on, and if so did you notice any improvement? I've seen mixed comments (some say do it, more responsive, some say don't bother it is only good for racing). For $50-$60, and while I'm staring at the bottom of my engine on a stand it seems like it is worth a shot. Plus it would help me make lemonade out of lemons (thanks mainemustang, haha :p ) from this delay my oil pan adventure has caused me.
 

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Their purpose is to keep the oil in the pan away from the spinning crankshaft, unless you are going to rev to about 7000 rpm or take corners like an indy car you will not notice any difference.
In race engines they can "sometimes" add a horsepower or 2
 

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I've got one in my autocross-driven vert, not for extra bhp, but to keep the spinning crank from churning the oil into chocolate mousse in a hard corner. Our oiling systems were concieved long before radial tires, big sway bars and gas shocks, so it might not take a lot in today's world to become a problem. If you're already torn down, at $50-60 its a cheap precaution, and invisible from the outside. I recommend it.
 

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No arguments here. I think the point is that on a street-driven car, the addition of a windage tray, crank-scraper or a combination of the two will have absolutely no noticeable effect.

While I have not done before and after dynos, I can honestly say that adding a windage tray made no difference when I added one to my 289 and my 390. Still, it's cool to say that I have them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the responses guys. I decided to go for it, due to the low cost and the fact that the engine is already out of the car. Sounds like it can't hurt, it might help, and at the very least makes for an interesting topic of conversation.

Plus, sure I don't plan on doing 7000 rpm or taking corners like an Indy car, but who knows what the future holds? :p
 

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Since you'll be installing special main cap bolts to mount the windage tray, I hope you have a torque wrench :)

I tend to agree with james_e, but I do have an old SVO tray on the OEM in my D-coder. Seems like the idiot light stays off longer when I run low on oil ;)

Pat
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yep on the torque wrench - 3 of them (low, medium, and high torque settings). I had the block machined, but I have assembled it myself. I'm trying to do everything by the book, but that first start up will be nerve-racking. I always wanted to put an engine together though, so we'll see how it goes.
 

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If something doesn't look right or fit right, stop.

We love entertainment :D

Seriously, where you assemble it can never be too clean, and that includes you. I never had a clean room so I always assembled my engines at night and knocked the dust down with water prior and wore one of my spray (chemical) coveralls when assembling.

Ideally, all blueprinting (the checking of dimensions and fitments) should be done prior to final cleaning of the parts.

New engines are so much fun :)

Pat
 
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