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Discussion Starter #1
I am removing the front and rear glass from a ‘67. It has the little pins to hold the molding. First, is there any sort of conversion gasket that you can use to delete the chrome trim and be done with it?
Barring that are the little screw in studs the best replacement for missing pins?
I also see lots of sealant being used when installing new glass. Is this necessary? I have installed a lot of glass in other makes, including pickups, and haven’t ever had to use any sort of sealant and have not had any leaks.

We are getting ready for paint and have removed the rear quarters to access the nuts on the back of the side louvers. Is there an assessment guide for these? They were kind of a pain to remove.

thanks,
 

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They make a special small screw that replaces the missing pins that hold the molding clips. W&E Sales is one company that makes them, part number 99-672 and they should be available at any auto supply shop that carries the clips.
The Mustangs are different than your standard gasket glass and if you don't seal them you are guaranteed a leak. 3-M 08509 is a good choice and a row of strip caulk inside is good insurance also.
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For some reason my 65 has some studs and some screws in the back glass channel. Be aware that the stud type clips slide onto the studs at a different height than the screw on clips or they do on a 65 anyway. Both clip types are available though but you may have to buy 2 full sets unless you can scrounge up the ones you need.

To elminate the clip on moldings you would need to convert to close fit glass which is wider and taller and probably not cheap. It uses a modern type gasket and installs like a modern windsheld or rear glass. I've seen it done in photos but I'm not sure if you can buy that set up or it was custom made.
 

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cool, but not cheap. Alternatively you could weld filler strips to the body to 1/2 fill the gaps, then black out the 1" edge of the glass like modern glass, glue in with urethane, and use a rubber molding to span the gap. Doable, haven't seen it done on a Mustang, so not sure that it would look 'right'? Tommy Boshers did it on a back glass of a car on Spike TV MuscleCar- it looked pretty good as I recall..
 

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As I understand it the bodies of the early Mustangs are not rigid enough to use a glue-in windshield. As the car is driven the body flexes and if the windshield is glued in place it will crack. The original rubber gasket allows for some flexing.
 

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I have a truck I drive that I put in windshield in. I noted almost no sealer on the rubber seal when I pulled it out and thought what the heck, I'll try it dry when I put it back in. No sealer and no leaks.
We can pretty much guarantee that WON'T work on your Mustang. I can't say why but you will need some bedding and glazing compound. OK, a LOT of compound, before it will be water tight. Many members here can chime in on difficulties getting rubber gasketed glasses to seal.
I once contacted 3M tech support and asked them about using urethane. Mostly because some goober on Youtube did one that way. They allowed as how you could but the best results would be had using the factory recommended bedding and glazing sealant. Since they make all that stuff and they ARE 3M I feel they are a more reliable source of info than some guy in front of a camera. You can contact 3M yourself if you like, very nice and helpful people.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, I was hoping to find a decent gasket with built in chrome, like the 67-72 chubby c10 gaskets. I didn’t really want to spend several thousand dollars on a windshield.
 
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