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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
These are some photos of the inner/outer rocker at the bottom of the passenger side. It has been sandblasted, but of course, after all this time, some rust has reappeared.

When you look at that jagged edge on the bottom (at the bullet area), where a lot of metal has obviously been eaten away over the years, would you live with this, somehow patch it (JB Weld?) or replace it.

I know it is on the bottom of the car, but when you look, it IS visible.

Same goes with the odd, double torque box (3rd photo) . Seems like that is wrong, too. As well, in one of these photos you can see an extra layer of sheet metal, that I can't account for (4th photo).

I guess I am just trying to get my head around whether or not this is a total redo, save for the front frame rails, maybe a few other items. I keep going back and forth, as I still have that fear I am going to take everything apart and not be able to get it back together with the right alignment, etc.

Thanks in advance for any replies.
 

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You're looking at substandard repairs. They should be re-welded properly. The thin spots should be cut out and replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Which ones are the thin spots?

It looks like some of the metal got chewed away from rust, and some got chewed away as these parts were welded (improperly).

If I were to grind away the improper welds, I would be a little concerned as to whether is possible to do so without gouging into the surrounding metal badly enough to make it look ridiculous.

Thanks for the reply.
 

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Sorry for bad news. On unibody vehicles like Vintage Mustangs (Maverick, Early Torino etc.) and many newer cars the rocker inner and outer are the base frame. Someone familiar with unibody vehicles should examine the under structure. So you know where I'm comming from I've had several of these cars that were very badly rusted out (I'm in the rust belt) and the outer rocker has always looked good.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry for bad news. On unibody vehicles like Vintage Mustangs (Maverick, Early Torino etc.) and many newer cars the rocker inner and outer are the base frame. Someone familiar with unibody vehicles should examine the under structure. So you know where I'm comming from I've had several of these cars that were very badly rusted out (I'm in the rust belt) and the outer rocker has always looked good.
Thanks, but it is not at all unexpected. I knew the repairs were done improperly a long time ago. I have had a few people examine the unibody, but it is interesting in hearing how many opinions there are. Those that are not real particular think everything can just be cleaned up, grinded a little and patched, while others think it is a redo.

I have had the car since I bought it off Ebay in 2002, so I am not maintaining a very good pace to get it on the road any time soon.

Seems like the choice is between living with substandard work - which looks bad and is inviting corrosion back in, or resign myself to a pretty extensive do-over.

THE PLUSES:

I have a Lincoln SP-135 welder, a set of Accessible System braces, grinder, air compressor, all related air tools. And because I have been doing so much back and forth on this, the time has allowed me the opportunity to save up enough cash to finish at least the structural stuff.

The car has some custom parts - a Heidts Superride front end, custom wheels, nice tires, a 3.55 posi rear end that has been totally rebuilt with new seals (but needs work on the housing).

It IS a convertible, and despite what so many people say, they are NOT that easy to come by, and there are not that many out there that are truly rust free.

THE MINUSES:

The car is NOT in a garage, but rather, is outside. SoCal weather is not that extreme, but exposed metal does develop surface rust pretty quickly.

My own lack of skill. I already paid nearly $6000 to have this done once, and am not going to go back to have still another body shop try their hand at it.
 

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Didn't know it is a convertible. I'm a convertible nut! The rocker structure is much more of the backbone on the convertibles because they have no roof completeing the structure. What did they do for $6000? Did that include the mechanical mods?

Way back then Ford heavily galvanized (zinc coated) the rocker because of it's importance structurally.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Didn't know it is a convertible. I'm a convertible nut! The rocker structure is much more of the backbone on the convertibles because they have no roof completeing the structure. What did they do for $6000? Did that include the mechanical mods?

Way back then Ford heavily galvanized (zinc coated) the rocker because of it's importance structurally.
No, that only included the improper workmanship on the unibody - frame rails (done correctly, actually), floor pans installed with Frankenstein-ish welds, sandblasting, improperly installed torque boxes, improperly installed aprons.

You get the idea.
 

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JFL sent you a PM.

Slim
 

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No, that only included the improper workmanship on the unibody - frame rails (done correctly, actually), floor pans installed with Frankenstein-ish welds, sandblasting, improperly installed torque boxes, improperly installed aprons.

You get the idea.
Damn I can do that. If you got another 6k you could swing it by my house. :p

The aprons were pretty easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Damn I can do that. If you got another 6k you could swing it by my house. :p

The aprons were pretty easy.

thanks for the offer!!


About the aprons . . . .

Were they pretty easy to get welded in, or positioned? See, I have a feeliing once I get my technique and welder settings down, that part is not going to be that tough.

What I am a little concerned about is not being able to get everything to line up. To be honest, if I wanted to, I could improvise and get everything to fit on. The alignment would not be right, one side would still be longer than the other, and the passenger side fender would be relying on the bracket in the door for proper elevation - leaving a gap between it and the apron underneath, but I could do it.

I just figure after all this time, I should get it done correctly.
 
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