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Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning on pulling the six out. I'd like to leave the C4 in for now but I suspect I have some things to change out on it so I might as well pull it too.

I read up as much as I could but still had some questions.

This is one of the more informative pages I read. http://averagejoerestoration.com/1967-68-mustang-6cyl-v8-conversion/

Questions:
  1. Pull the engine and leave the trans? I'm selling the engine and at this time I'm planning on using the C4 behind a stock 289.
  2. From the link above it says the bell housing is not shared between the I6 and V8. So I might as well pull the tranny now too?
  3. I saw several mentions of 5 bolt vs 6 bolt. I couldn't tell if that referred to the bell housing to engine or the engine to engine plate.
I obviously haven't torn into one of these cars before as I'm sure things would get apparent quickly. I'm just trying to be prepared before I start taking things apart.

To pull the engine I was going to remove the following:
Radiator hoses (upper and lower)
Radiator
Transmission Cooling lines
Heater hoses (two)
Power and Ground cables to engine/starter
There are three small wires on the drivers side (to the head is the water temp sensor?)(the big canister thing centered on the block is probably the oil pressure sender?) and finally one wire to the coil.
Carb linkage
Alternator wires
I'll probably just have to cut the exhaust, it's mighty rusting looking at the manifold to exhaust pipe junction.
Fuel line to fuel pump

Any suggestions as the best place to hook onto the engine with the hoist?








 

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If trans tired as the engine, why not pull it all out as one? Sell the engine. But depending on miles of trans, you may wanna get it rebuilt now.
To pull a I6, been awhile. Chain around exhaust manifold one side, around motor mount on other?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not sure how tired the engine is. Not running when I got it and I'm not going to spend the time and money making it run.
 

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You will need a V8 bell, flex plate and torque converter to use the 6 cyl tranny behind a V8.

Its easiest to pull everything as a unit.

You may as well reseal the tranny and change the fluid and filter.

What engine are you planning on?
 

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As for engine removal and install, I just went through this with my 66 I6 to V8 conversion. As for the I6 removal, I removed the C4 1st for my own personal reason and installed the 289 with the C4 installed. 1) Having a leveler on your hoist is nice, makes going in and out easier, but it can be done without one.......I removed and installed all by myself, so it was a must have for me. 2) If you are like me, working in your garage, on your back, car on jack stands and no transmission jack, it was nice installing the 289 & C4 as an assembly. Doing this seperatly in you garage, on your back, car on jacks, no transmission jack, and trying to get your torque converter installed correctly and bolted up to the flex plate.......yes, so glad I installed the C4 on the 289 and installed as an assembly. 3) I am sure you can leave your hood on, I did for the removal and it was a close fit, but working by myself installing the engine/transmission assembly, am glad I removed the hood. I wanted to remove the hood anyways to have the underside repainted.

As for best place to secure the engine to the hoist, I cant recall eactly where.......but think I only used 2 points. Just choose a beefy bolt and if needed, some thick grade 8 washers.

If I did the removal again, would pull both as an assembly. Disconnect the drive shaft, shifter linkage, cooling lines, aft trans support bracket, and wire harness to your neutral cutoff assy, speedometer cabe, and I disconnect my parking brake to give me more room and you should be good to go.

I my be wrong, people will correct me, but most, not all 289's are 6 bolt, some early ones where 5 bolt which will require the 5 bolt bell housing. Do an internet search for the differances and you will see a pic with the bolt patterns.

739980
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I do have a transmission jack. So if I can leave the transmission in place and just unbolt the bell house I'd like that. Then I can remove the transmission at my leisure.

Not to say it might not still be easier to pull them together. I'll await further input.
 

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5 and 6 bolts refers to the number of bolts that attach the bellhousing to the engine block on the small block V8 (260, 289, 351) engines. Up until August of 1964 those engines (260, 289) only had 5 bolts. After the changeover to the 1965 model cars those engines had 6 bolts. And you can't attach a 6 bolt bellhousing to a 5 bolt block or vice versa. The 351W (1969) and 351C (1970) only came in the 6 bolt version.
And FWIW- the manual transmissions used with the 5 bolt bellhousings had a smaller bolt pattern than the 6 bolt transmissions. The 6 bolt transmissions had both the small 5 bolt pattern and the larger 6 bolt pattern.
 

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Not sure how tired the engine is. Not running when I got it and I'm not going to spend the time and money making it run.
Odds are good the engine could be running for next to no cost. The 200 was reliable as sunrise.

V8 conversion has a whole host of associated cost-

To change a 67-70 6 to 8 you need:

V8 front brakes
V8 sway bar
V8 motor mounts and brackets
V8 radiator
V8 engine wiring
V8 engine
V8 transmission
V8 exhaust system
V8 fuel line
V8 driveshaft
V8 rear axle
V8 rear brakes
V8 wheels

Some other stuff , which I forgot.

Surely an afternoon spent getting the 200 running is worth avoiding all that expense.
 

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Stock V8 won't be all that fast anyways, but the rumble is undeniably cool...
If you put dual headers and stock GT exhaust on the 200, it sounds pretty good. A while back I was at a show, a 66 Mustang pulled in, nice exhaust note, and when he stopped I could see his wheels were 4-bolt. Surprised me, I'll tell you.
 

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If you’re planning on going with a strictly stock 289, I would just leave the 200. I speak from experience since I did this same swap on my 67. The difference is that I have a heavily modded 289 which made the conversion a bit more worth it. A stock 289 on paper may make more power than a 200, but also remember that it also weighs more. The potential gains just aren’t worth it for a stock 289. And though performance parts aren’t as plentiful for the 200 as the 289, there are still parts out there to beef them up. A quick Summit search found two Comp cams available for it and I know Hooker makes long tube headers for it. Also, something to consider, the 200 is SO much more easier to work on in the car. You can practically get in the engine bay with the motor. My 289 I have to cuss at for hours because I can’t get the header bolts to line up to the head and usually I give up and someone else has to do it that has more patience than me, haha, I don’t know how anyone can work on a 390 in these. Do what you want, I’m just saying that I’ve been in your shoes. Now if you were talking about putting a 427w stroker in and making some monster power, the conversion would most definitely be worth it. A stock 289? Probably not.
 

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With what you're going to go through with a six-to-eight conversion it makes stuff like this so much more appealing....

 

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On my 66 I used the left rear head bolt and the right front manifold bolt. That way you can balance the engine or give it a slight tilt as needed. If you plan to move the car with the C4 still there, you can support it at the bell housing with a rope/chain from the sub-frame to sub-frame (underneath) or from hood hinge to top bell housing bolts to hood hinge. I've done them both ways even with 289s.

I'm planning on pulling the six out. I'd like to leave the C4 in for now but I suspect I have some things to change out on it so I might as well pull it too.

I read up as much as I could but still had some questions.

This is one of the more informative pages I read. http://averagejoerestoration.com/1967-68-mustang-6cyl-v8-conversion/

Questions:
  1. Pull the engine and leave the trans? I'm selling the engine and at this time I'm planning on using the C4 behind a stock 289.
  2. From the link above it says the bell housing is not shared between the I6 and V8. So I might as well pull the tranny now too?
  3. I saw several mentions of 5 bolt vs 6 bolt. I couldn't tell if that referred to the bell housing to engine or the engine to engine plate.
I obviously haven't torn into one of these cars before as I'm sure things would get apparent quickly. I'm just trying to be prepared before I start taking things apart.

To pull the engine I was going to remove the following:
Radiator hoses (upper and lower)
Radiator
Transmission Cooling lines
Heater hoses (two)
Power and Ground cables to engine/starter
There are three small wires on the drivers side (to the head is the water temp sensor?)(the big canister thing centered on the block is probably the oil pressure sender?) and finally one wire to the coil.
Carb linkage
Alternator wires
I'll probably just have to cut the exhaust, it's mighty rusting looking at the manifold to exhaust pipe junction.
Fuel line to fuel pump

Any suggestions as the best place to hook onto the engine with the hoist?








 

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Discussion Starter #16
Odds are good the engine could be running for next to no cost. The 200 was reliable as sunrise.

V8 conversion has a whole host of associated cost-

To change a 67-70 6 to 8 you need:

V8 front brakes
V8 sway bar
V8 motor mounts and brackets
V8 radiator
V8 engine wiring
V8 engine
V8 transmission
V8 exhaust system
V8 fuel line
V8 driveshaft
V8 rear axle
V8 rear brakes
V8 wheels

Some other stuff , which I forgot.

Surely an afternoon spent getting the 200 running is worth avoiding all that expense.
There the rub. When you're looking at a project car you have two choices, invest in what you have or upgrade. Now if this was a running and driving car I would be less inclined to just replace for replacement sake, but it's a project so I'm replacing most of the above parts anyways. So should I replace with like 6 parts or for the same or a wee bit more money get the V8 parts?

Then there is the value. 6<V8 swap<stock V8
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you’re planning on going with a strictly stock 289, I would just leave the 200. I speak from experience since I did this same swap on my 67. The difference is that I have a heavily modded 289 which made the conversion a bit more worth it. A stock 289 on paper may make more power than a 200, but also remember that it also weighs more. The potential gains just aren’t worth it for a stock 289. And though performance parts aren’t as plentiful for the 200 as the 289, there are still parts out there to beef them up. A quick Summit search found two Comp cams available for it and I know Hooker makes long tube headers for it. Also, something to consider, the 200 is SO much more easier to work on in the car. You can practically get in the engine bay with the motor. My 289 I have to cuss at for hours because I can’t get the header bolts to line up to the head and usually I give up and someone else has to do it that has more patience than me, haha, I don’t know how anyone can work on a 390 in these. Do what you want, I’m just saying that I’ve been in your shoes. Now if you were talking about putting a 427w stroker in and making some monster power, the conversion would most definitely be worth it. A stock 289? Probably not.
Short term goal is the stock V-8, longer term would be a more modified V-8, so the initial investments in the V-8 parts won't be a throwaway.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Starter, alternator and radiator pulled. Heater hoses disconnected.

Unfortunately I pulled the alternator off before loosening the fan blade. Not sure if that would have made a difference.

From what I have gathered I need to unbolt the torque converter. Then just the bell housing bolts and the motor mounts, right?



It will be nice to have an empty bay to get at the steering column (I want to pull it and put in a later or aftermarket one) and just clean. And address the copious rust.
 

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Removing the fan and spacer will give you an extra 4-5" of space to move the block forward after the trans bolts are out. And you'll need to take out the flexplate to torque converter bolts (otherwise you'll dump a lot of fluid out of the converter when it comes out of the trans) also the exhaust pipe to manifold bolts/nuts (maybe even throttle linkage & fuel line to fuel pump and sender/coil/ wiring connectors). That is, if you're leaving the trans in the car.
 

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There the rub. When you're looking at a project car you have two choices, invest in what you have or upgrade. Now if this was a running and driving car I would be less inclined to just replace for replacement sake, but it's a project so I'm replacing most of the above parts anyways. So should I replace with like 6 parts or for the same or a wee bit more money get the V8 parts?

Then there is the value. 6<V8 swap<stock V8
Betcha a good look through engine tuning would have it running at little or no cost. Don't assume that because you can't just turn the key and start it means the engine is trashed.

It's not a "wee bit more". V8 conversion will run in the thousands.

V8 conversion will not replace the "T" in the VIN, so the value, IMHO, will be little effected.

Odds are good it could be running for under $10.
 
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