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For right around $225 you can get a gallon and quart of TCP Global proper single stage auto paint. Reducer, hardener, the whole bit enough to do a Mustang.
For that matter, Eastwood has any number of single stage paints ranging from $120-220 per sprayable gallon, but I wouldn't buy less than 3 gallons myself(2 coats with a 3rd mixed 50/50 with a 2k clear would still allow enough left over to paint a hood or something should you choose to change it out later)

I havent yet used any Eastwood paints, but everything else from them that I have bought has been great.
 

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The problem with Rustoleum (and enamels in general) is it doesn't have any UV inhibitors in it, so it will fade and chalk with time. If you limit time in the sun it will prolong the time until this effect happens. If you spray a clear coat on the car then it will be protected from UV and can still achieve a high gloss.

I spray tractors and implements with enamels because they're extremely durable, but even those I still clear coat to keep the gloss.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Again, not everyone can spray. I can't because of my setting in the woods even tho I have all the gear. To buy an adequate compressor, a decent gun with a couple of tips, cups....
And that outlay of $$$ is for a one-time project.

I spent $19 plus shipping (Amazon) for a quart, used three and could have done it with two if I had more experience.
UV rays aren't such a problem in western Oregon where we don't tan, we rust. But even if it does get chalky I hit it with some sandpaper and roll on another layer of Rustoleum. Total cost: $25.
 

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Again, not everyone can spray. I can't because of my setting in the woods even tho I have all the gear. To buy an adequate compressor, a decent gun with a couple of tips, cups....
And that outlay of $$$ is for a one-time project.

I spent $19 plus shipping (Amazon) for a quart, used three and could have done it with two if I had more experience.
UV rays aren't such a problem in western Oregon where we don't tan, we rust. But even if it does get chalky I hit it with some sandpaper and roll on another layer of Rustoleum. Total cost: $25.
Oh I agree, I am a fan of the roller paint jobs...but I do have to ask...what does being in the woods have anything to do with it? It doesnt matter if the paint is rolled or sprayed, bugs, dust, leaf particles will get in it either way if painting outside...unless I am missing something?

Oh...and there is no such thing as a one-time project...its why I always buy tools instead of renting...if I do something once, I am more likely to do it again in the future, even if its not the same car.
 

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About 20 years ago, I was coming out of my apartment and saw an old lady downstairs painting her VW Beetle with a roller and green house paint! Surprisingly, it was an improvement since it had been 3 colors and primer before. Its still looked the same a year later when I moved. Kinda looked like spray on bed liner : )
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Oh I agree, I am a fan of the roller paint jobs...but I do have to ask...what does being in the woods have anything to do with it? It doesnt matter if the paint is rolled or sprayed, bugs, dust, leaf particles will get in it either way if painting outside...unless I am missing something?
I could use the roller in the tight confines of my dirt floor "garage" where there isn't room to spray. Can't back up far enough to use a spray gun.
In AZ I could spray some parts like the cab (tall) in the driveway. With humidity levels in the teens and no bugs it worked fine. Not here.
Other advantages using a roller: Don't need to worry about getting overspray on everything else in the space. At our place in AZ I could mask off the walls & floor of my 2-stall with plastic but that only would have made for even less room here in OR.
And with a roller job you don't spend hours just taping and masking the car. I used blue painter's tape around trim and left glass uncovered.

For a reasonable budget job...I'm a fan.
 

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I painted the front half of mine with Rustoleum and a roller back in 2016. I only did the front half (in front of the windshield) because it had been crashed and had unpainted replacement panels. The color doesn't exactly match the crappy old paint on the rest of it, but I don't really care. I used Rustoleum because I'm poor.


Before:




Right after painting:


It's far from perfect but it still looks as good as the day I painted it, plus a few rock chips because it's a daily driver and road trip machine. Oh yeah, and it's been parked outside in the sun and rain the whole time.


A couple months ago:



I would do it again, and someday I'll get around to painting the rest of it. Might actually go with something more interesting than white though.


I've also mixed Rustoleum to color-match some old weathered paint on an MGB GT project, to paint a repaired panel without painting the whole car:


 

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The foam roller technique started off with body guys using it to lay down high build primer without having to move the car into the booth. They could spot prime right in the middle of the shop floor and get on with their job. High build gets sanded anyway, so the finish wasn't important. Doubt I'd use it to do a complete job, just a lot of work afterwards to make it look good.

I've used Rustoleum as a repair paint, my 71 Cougar XR-7 was an exact match to Appliance Almond. I used Duplicolor Auto panel paint on my '72 T-bird, wet sanded and buffed it out for a nice finish.
 

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There is a guy from Sweden (I think) named Magnus Marthinsen that painted his Mustang the same as my New Holland tractor....I don't mean the color, I mean the exact paint.
 

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You moved your project forward in the best way you could and from the fuzzy pictures it doesn't look bad at all. It's longevity and such is a matter for the future. Kudos to you for finding a way.
Haha...looks like Photobucket caught up with a free account posting(wasnt blurred and watermarked when he first posted it). They did the same thing to me until I finally just paid the yearly subscription. I might have gone somewhere else except for the fact that I have half a dozen different car builds over a dozen years on different forums and dont want those threads to lose the detailed pictures. I figured the $50 or whatever photobucket charged per year was worth it so other people have the information they might be interested in from those threads.
 

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The low budget circle track guys would roller with exterior latex sometimes. Longevity wasn’t an issue as there was bumping and banging enough so it needed to be touched up every week or two. Tractor paint was also used. I used the TCP but I wasn’t thrashing around for a top spot so I wasn’t touching it up every week.
 

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There is a guy from Sweden (I think) named Magnus Marthinsen that painted his Mustang the same as my New Holland tractor....I don't mean the color, I mean the exact paint.
That thing came out nice...it makes me wish I had an excuse to flare my fenders and quarters.
 

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That thing came out nice...it makes me wish I had an excuse to flare my fenders and quarters.
He's running 315s all around, says it really hangs the curves.
 

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He's running 315s all around, says it really hangs the curves.
Very tempting...the downside to front flares though is that they kinda ruin the body line....and the other trouble is I dont want 17" wheels...finding 16s in a width able to fit 315s might be challenging.
 

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I remember when I was in my early 20s, looking out my front window and seeing the neighbor across the street taping up the glass on his 66 Tempest hardtop with masking tape and newspaper. Before I knew it he was mixing some paint in a bucket with some other liquid then began painting his car yellow with a 4" brush for the large areas and smaller brushes for the hard to get areas. He did remove the bumpers, grill and windshield chrome molding. I was laughing thinking about it. When he was done you could see brush strokes in the paint. It didn't look like he was stingy with the paint when he was applying it. The car sat for about a week after he finished painting. It was a mess. There was little luster and I could still see brush strokes when it dried. What happened next was the neighbor began rubbing the paint with rubbing compound and an orbital buffer. He spent several days rubbing out the paint. Panel after panel the car began to shine. Up close the paint looked fantastic and deep. They neighbor I found out later that he used a single stage automotive paint and, a reducer and a hardener, enough so it would harden but at a rate that he could finish painting the car by hand.

So I guess don't laugh until you see the finished product but then you may just be amazed.
 
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