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If you haven't, then congratulations, you haven't fallen to my level yet! :pirate:

Here's the story, brief as I can make it: I've been working on the front suspension rebuild from hell. The Curse of Jane is in full effect (probably more so than usual, as she lost some paint the other day and hasn't taken revenge for that yet). I've had pieces in and out a million times and run into a million problems, it feels like. Well, today I finally got to THE END. All I had to do was the alignment. So I swapped some shims around, got it all hunky dory, and went to tighten the nuts on the UCA.

Well, while I was messing with the alignment I had removed the lock nuts and put on just plain old normal nuts, which are easier to spin on and off while adjusting. Imagine my (unfortunately lack of) surprise when I went to remove the last nut and it was... just somehow stuck on the stud. I spun this nut on by hand no problem, but when it came to removing it it was just... stuck. Spun up the stud a few threads, and stopped dead.

I cranked on this sucker like you wouldn't believe. At one point the only way I could even remotely move it was by leaning my full weight on a breaker bar. That's the point at which I realized I was not going to be removing this nut. So I tightened it back up (and it went just fine) and torqued it to spec. Fortunately, there's a lock washer under it so I don't think it's going to go anywhere, though it does bother me that this random nut is stuck on the stud. I just cannot fathom HOW it happened.

I inspected the threads once the nut was retightened. It appears that a thread got smashed, and one just got removed entirely... somehow...????




Anyways, not looking for advice here or anything. Next time I want to remove the UCA I'll have to pull the header and wrangle a Dremel in there to slice the nut off, then replace the stud. Mostly I just wanted to remind people here that if you're ever feeling particularly retarded... well, at least you didn't crossthread a nut removing it from a bolt :lol::yoho:
 

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I did that with my idler arm bracket.... Now I need to replace it again...
 

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I am relieved to discover that this particular disorder is not uniquely mine, LOL. I dropped the heads on my block, the first one did the clunk/clank drop sound. I put the second one on, no drop. I took it off and tried to put it back on for an hour and a half looking at all sorts of things. Finally, I discovered or it appears that the block dowel pins on one side were too large so the head wouldn't drop. First head on and torqued, 10 minutes. Second head, 2 hours, LOL.

I just realized looking at the photo that my nuts do not have washers, uh, my upper control arm nuts. However, I think my nuts are flattened out on the backs?

Lika theese ones;



Just thinking sort of, is it possible that the one nut has a slightly different thread pitch and it torqued down but it would bugger your threads doing so and getting it backed off would be a challenge. I have done that on a bolt from time to time. The threads on those upper control arm bolts are some fine thread if I remember right.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The bolts are 1/2-20, yep. The nuts that you have pictured I think are the stock nuts as that's what I pulled off my old UCAs. The new UCAs came with a washer, a lock washer, and an unflanged locknut.

The nut I put on there is 1/2-20 and spun on by hand just fine, so shouldn't have been any different... and you'd think that if it was even slightly different, then it would have ruined the threads at the base of the stud where I was torquing it down instead of towards the end of the stud where there was no pressure on it!

Many days I am my own worst enemy. But some days I'm pretty sure that Jane is my worst enemy LOL
 

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Yeah, I still have my thread chasing set and that's actually the first thing I went for. But it turns out the stud, when pulled through this much, is too close to the header to fit the die on. So I'd have to pull the header to do that. Pull the header and I need a new set of the fancy graphite gaskets I use... and on and on.
 

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You might consider lopping that bolt off right at the bad thread, removing the mangled nut (and the washer that probably shouldn't be there anyway) and putting your proper flanged nut on. It looks like you would still have a safe margin of threaded bolt extending to me. A Dremel or a Stanley Mini-Hack Saw (less than $10) should do it.
 

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You might consider lopping that bolt off right at the bad thread, removing the mangled nut (and the washer that probably shouldn't be there anyway) and putting your proper flanged nut on. It looks like you would still have a safe margin of threaded bolt extending to me. A Dremel or a Stanley Mini-Hack Saw (less than $10) should do it.
This is what I would do. Once the exposed portion is cut off (use a sawzall), you can remove the nut and there will be enough room to clean up the threads with a chaser.
 

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Looks more like you galled a cheap stainless nut to me.
Same here. That looks like metal from inside the nut stuck in the threads of the bolt- not a boogered or missing thread on the bolt. Looking at the deformation on the exterior hex I would say that is a soft nut.
Get a dental pick and see if you can dig the excess metal out of the threads.
 

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Yup, galled threads from a cheap nut and no lubrication. The metal on the bolt is threads ripped out of the nut. Next time oil the treads to ease the repetitive on/off. I personally wouldn't leave it, but at this point, you would have to cut it off.
 

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Kelly in your OP you commented you spun on plain old normal nuts while geting the set up right.

Any chance those normal nuts were low grade stainless? All that mashing of the nut looks like soft metal maybe soft stainless?

The material left on the stud/bolt sure looks like galling.
 

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Kelly,
Im by no means 'piling on' here - Ive mangled (and pulled my hair out over) my share of nuts/bolts in my 6 decades but I was going to ask what several others here already have: were those stainless nuts? It definitely looks like thread galling.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hmm, IIRC it's a grade 8 nut as I got it from one of the specialty drawers at Home Depot. Never heard of galling and had to look it up! Certainly looks like what happened, though again, I cannot fathom how it happened to get stuck at the part of the stud where there was no friction on it at all. The threads at the base of the stud are fine. The nut was turning on and off just fine literally thirty minutes before the whole fiasco.

Yes, it did entirely eat one thread right there in the middle of the stud. It's just gone! Interestingly, when I was trying to pull the nut off I got it to the end of the stud and off by about one thread - so it appears to have eaten the one thread, while leaving the other ones at the end perfectly fine :shrug:

Can't say that I ever thought I would need to have a procedure for tightening and loosening a nut a few times...
 
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