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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, here is the deal, I bought a 1965 mustang fastback when I was 18 (5 years ago). Since then we have had our ups and downs, and now after college, and lots of DIY projects, she is in dire need of some major love.

Among the major problems with the car, are a leaky cowl (imagine that), leaky back window (rather recent development), too many (bad) layers of paint, bondo in the rear quarters (probably needs cut out and rewelded in), and needs new fenders and door skins. The car appears to have been in an accident, and the body lines on the drivers side don't match up real well. These are the problems that I know about, but have heard horror stories of finding more rust behind the rear quarters when you open it up. Other than this, the engine is in decent shape, the floorboards have been replaced, undercarriage is good, and the interior is good, as I have spent a good amount of time/effort fixing it up.

I am trying to take a step back and weigh the choices here, as I am trying to decide if I should just sell it, or if I should invest the money to restore her to her original beauty. I would normally sell it, but this car holds a large amount of sentimental value, not to mention being told by many of the older gentlemen I see that they had a car like mine, and the biggest mistake they ever did was sell it...

I just graduated college and have a good job (military officer) and don't have a girlfriend/wife to spend my money yet. I feel like I should make the decision now before it's too late, and I have a wife that wants me to sell it so we can have some aluminum siding or something...

I am sure almost everyone on this board has had to ask themselves the same question: when should I "fold"? So I would like to ask those of you how you made your decision, and if you regret the path you chose. Also I would like to hear any suggestions or comments about my situation. Normally I would have it appraised and decide then, but it is currently in a garage on the outskirts of a tiny po-dunk town and doesn't run (minor electrical problems) so I would have to pay someone to come look at it for me. Any information would be appreciated, and thank you all in advance! If you have any other questions, fire away!
 

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I guess the biggest questions to ask are : How much money will it cost to fix? How much time involved? Is your heart in it (not just sentimentally, but through the ups and downs of restoring)? And what is probably most important, do you intend to keep the car after you fix it.

Most restoration jobs ending being a costly bit of work. There are those who won't stop until every inch of there car is like new. Others just want to stop the rust, preserve the live of the car another 20 years.

There is a huge market for fastbacks out there so someone will give it that love and attention. I wouldn't let sentimental feelings hold you from making an educated, informed decision. And only you can make that.

Good luck!

James
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I love the car, and like everyone else, have gone to the brink of insanity and back over unexpected projects. If I go ahead and spend the money to restore it, I will be having a good portion of it professionally, and will probably end up keeping it until my kids bury me in it. I have done a few projects half-assed in the past few years, and have definately realized that that isn't anywhere I want to go. I want the car done right, no patch jobs.

As far as costs go, I am really unsure. I have heard that if you take a car into the body shop, don't expect to spend anything under $5000. Unfortunately I have a lot of work to get done to the body, so I imagine my bill will run a bit higher. I would assume with all the work I am looking at somewhere around $15000 to $20000 after the paint, body and a few misc parts/improvements around the car.

I want to have a nice car, but not so nice I feel bad about driving it.
 

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1) looking at it as an all in one lump sum to restore will most certainly turn you off and scare you away.

2) Doing it one step at a time and lovingly will look a lot more manageable and you will mercifully not realize just how much you put into it.

3) And just how "old" are these "older gentlemen"?? :joker:
 

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71 Mach1, Mcode, AOD, 4 wheel discs, Ram air, Cragars in Vermilion Fire paint.
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Buddy, you're only 23!

That still qualifies you in the "young and stupid" category!
I'll hazard a guess and say that if you don't spend the money on the car, you may blow it elsewhere!

Soooooo ......taking that into account, if you do decide to "fix" it properly, what will you have ....?

1] An investment which is increasing in value almost daily!
(probably better than "bricks & mortar" at the moment!)

2] A dream machine that pretty much all of your mates will drool over! (And a chick magnet to boot!) :biggrin:

3] If you didn't already have the car, I'd say don't bother, but you do have it! So you can't lose!
What are you waiting for!

cheers from downunder.
 

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I'd keep it if I were you. You probably dont owe anything on it, so it doesn't cost you anything to keep it around.
The money for selling it may seem attractive, since even pretty torn up 65/66 fastbacks pull close to $10k on ebay regularly, but you will definitely thank yourself later if you keep it around. If its your only car, I'd look into getting yourself a cheap daily driver and put the fastback away until finances permit you to do it right. Like alot of us, you may end up just starting on the project and learning as you go.
 

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I'm 24 and my 66 fastback is in the same boat yours is in. Don't sell it, or you'll regret it for the rest of your life. I hear it over and over again from guys at shows and cruises near me that they say they had one like it when they were our age and they sold it and wish they hadn't. If you can't work on it right now, store it, but don't get rid of it.
 

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If I had a cool car when I was young and someone convinced me to keep they would be a life long friend. Do whatever you can to keep it. How cool is it to run into someone that says to you "I have had that car since I was 18 years old". When you are 35 like me that would be one of the coolest things I could hear from anyone. You really cannot put a value on sentimental value.
 

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Just as nolookingback says, and work on your mechanial abilaties at the same time, almost anyone can become better at working on thier car by just doing it, you might miss up a time or two, but start with easy projects frist and work your way up to the harder ones. Also find some friends to work with, nothing like bullshittin and bench racing with the guys on the weekend and working on a car. :joker:
 

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I agree with the others...keep it. You say you'd have the work done professionally. I have to ask why? Is it because of time constraints, actual ability, or something else? Time...well the way things are today, I can fully understand that one. Actual ability...I think that one is easy to overcome. However it cuts into the time thing (go figure). All it takes is time and lots of patience. If it's something else...well, you have to figure that one out. Regardless, I'd keep it.

I bought a '72 240z from my brother back in 85. I loved that car. If I could do then with a welder what I can do now, I'd still own it (not much left of the rails). Anyway, I digress. Don't let yourself be one of "us" that can already say something like that.
 

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KEEP IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I sold a 73 MACH 1 Q code 4spd to buy a house after I got married. The deal fell through,money gone,car gone. Drove myself crazy thinking about it,still do 12 years later. KEEP IT!!!!!!!!
 

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Drewpey, I would keep it and fix her up. Fastbacks are not easy to find. Where in Illinois are you from. Their are a few of us in my area and we would be glad to help. I have already learned lots of things the hard way and I would be glad to help and there are many mistakes that I have made along the way that I could keep you from making.
 

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You've heard this before - keep the car.

I'd recommend being selective on what you farm out "professionally. Since you're in the military, there is going to be a post PX/BX hobby shop garage wherever you go. Cut rate place to work on the car, full lifts, every tool you'll ever need, and lots of those old guys around with knowledge on how to do the work. Be sure you evaluate the staff, some may be better/more knowledgeable than others. Those old guys also probably know who the best pros are off post, get to know them and look at their rides. My bet is that if you show up at the hobby shop garage with that 'stang you'll have more help than you can deal with.
 

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I'm with the general consensus, keep it. When I bought my first Mustang in 1985, I didn't know a carb from an alternator. Look at the '67 in my sig., I've had it since I was 19 and did all the work myself. You can do it, and like was already said, they are getting harder to find. Getting there is half the fun. Good luck with whatever you decide.

Joe
 

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I'm the only one in the "sell" camp, but from what I am reading, it would be in your best interest. You are planning on spending about $20K (if you think $15K will handle it then you are probably going to go above that by a good bit) I would say that since the market is so hot for Fastbacks right now that your car would sell for around $8K-$12K based on the limited discription you gave. If you add the $10K average potential sale price to the $20K you plan on spending, that's $30K that you could use to buy a VERY nice completed car. The adds below are just a sampling of what can be had from very low $30K's all the way down to under $20K. If sentimental value is so strong on your current fastback (and I don't see how since you have only had it 5 years, did not meet your wife or have your baby in it and it spent a lot of time in storage) you can still pick up a VERY nice solid fastback for under $20K by doing your shopping and KEEP the one you have now in storage. Either way, for what you could get for yours or get with whaty you are willing to spend on yours you can have a COMPLETED car. In the $30K range you can find not only a completed car, but a FABULOUS car, many with plenty of restomod touches like better brakes and much more powerful drivetrains and 4 or 5 speeds. Look at some of the add samplings below and think.... I can have THAT car right now, or i can worry and struggle with mine for the next two years (read some of midlife's post about his restoration) OR I can sell mine and be driving THESE cars below RIGHT NOW. I think your sentimental attachment might just be towards a cool fastback Mustang, not THAT particular car. And, if you sell, your car will probably wind up with someone who will also give it a good home and a nice resto.

http://www.cars-on-line.com/16671.html

http://arizonaclassics.net/moredetails.html?82201687

http://www.cars-on-line.com/20822.html

http://www.cars-on-line.com/20327.html

http://www.cars-on-line.com/23093.html

http://www.cars-on-line.com/22093.html

http://www.cars-on-line.com/20702.html

http://www.universalautosalesandclassiccars.com/65Mustang.htm

http://www.cars-on-line.com/17719.html
 

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Just my opinion and I have definitely had some bad experiences in my restomod, but the joy of building your own car is a GREAT experience. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, I appreciate all the feedback. When I speak of getting the work done professionally, I am talking about the bodywork and paint job. I want the body lines to line up nicely, no weld lines to show up, and the door skins to fit like new (hopefully). The paint was done cheaply by a "guy I knew" and it ended up rather disappointing, but oh well.

I have put a lot of work into the car, most of which had been done by me (couldn't fix a warped head, or weld in new floor panels)

I do not owe anything on the car, and my parents built a large shed a while back, and my dad made sure we had a little extra space to fit it in, so its not rusting away in the fabulous Illinois weather. I have moved though, as my job permits and would have to get it shipped.

Can anyone give me a ballpark amount on how much I can expect to ship an old 65, say, to texas? Wondering if it would be cheaper just to do it myself with a uhaul or something (or find a buddy w/ a truck and buy him lots of beer).

Also can anyone give me some guidance to finding a good body shop? There are professional places around but I am unsure about using them, as I don't feel they would spend the time and care I would want on it. Back home there was an older gentleman who used to do bodywork on old cars like that, and people suggested him. The only problem I have with this is I have also been warned about guys like this is that personal events (divorce etc.) can stall the project for years. Not sure where to start on this one, and could use a little more guidance if possible. Thanks in adavance! (I think I am going to keep her)
 

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OK, this is going to be harsh, so scroll on down past it if you can't bear to read it.

Here is where your mere 23 years of inexperience is showing. YOU ARE CURRENTLY LIVING IN TEXAS, WHERE RUST FREE CARS ARE PLENTIFUL AND YOU ARE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO GET A RUSTED ILL. FASTBACK SHIPPED THERE! What, are you crazy? When you take your rusted pile to a shop in Texas they are not going to know what to do with all that rust.

Come on guys, give this guy some REAL advice and not just the typical "feel good" keep it or you'll regret it line.

Since he already has stated that he is not going to do the work himself, why should he be given the advice to take on a rusty fastback being done at VERY high expense through a professional shop?? Does he really need a "lemondrop" experience through his wallet? All of you gave him advice as if it was THIS fastback, or no fastback. Sure, keep him in the hobby. But for MOST people the thrill of owning a classic car is NOT breathing rust dust and nursing welding burns and cuts. It is washing, driving and enjoying owning a CAR, not a project. Unless there is OVERWHELMING reason why he is attached to THAT car, he should sell the car in Illinois and take his $$ adn buy the finished car of his dreams.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
First, the car isn't an IL car, I actually got it from Minnesota (even worse!).

Second, I appreciate the advice. I don't want to sell it and buy another for a few reasons, so I'll list my concerns and perhaps you can help give me your perspective on that too.

Currently, my cars body is in ok shape. The reason I want so much done on the body is because there is bondo everywhere, and it's starting to bubble up in some spots, and just want to be done with it for good. The truth is, I doubt I could get much out of it. Yes, it is a fastback, but its got a few little problems. It's a car only a mustang enthousiast could love, as most would turn and run when I was upfront with the car's problems. Currently the car doesn't even run due to a short somewhere in the electronics. Not a huge deal, but no one in their right mind would buy a car based on trust that it works fine, if you can work out the kinks.

Second, over the past 5 years, I have put a lot of work into this car, so I know it pretty good inside and out, and despite its age, I feel confident of it's dependability, because I have replaced a lot on it. I fear selling this one I would take a huge hit to my wallet, while at the same time buying a car that could possibly give me the same problems/headaches I just paid for in this car. I feel with this car, I at least know that certain systems are good for a few years and I won't have to worry about unexpected expenses as much as I would worry on a brand new(old) car.

Here are some pictures of the car when I first bought it. About the only difference with regards to the body is a little more bubbling of the bondo, and my mom backed into my mustang (picture included, not for the faint of heart). The engine compartment doesn't look as good either, all dusty now.

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/trunk2.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/trunk.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/steering.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/Right.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/Left.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/engine.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/backseat.jpg
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/Back.jpg

the damage:
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c90/drewpey/ouch.jpg
 
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