Vintage Mustang Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!
  • May's Ride of the Month contest ended with a tie! Go to this thread to vote on the winner! VOTE HERE
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been a while since I posted a new thread, but I just can't find any info that addresses this clearly.

I really need to disassemble my clutch linkage, as I've had numerous issues with it over the years and I think it bears inspection. I know back in the day when I replaced the upper and lower arms, I was young & dumb and probably didn't replace all the right plastic bushings and I'm sure I have a lot of metal-on-metal wear. I don't believe I ever looked at the pivots on the frame and block, and I want to figure out if the z-bar itself is in decent shape or needs replacement.

All the info/pics I see either have no power booster or have MC removed, if not the whole engine as well. My car is not at my home, and I went out to her yesterday to see what I could see. Unfortunately, the master cylinder and the steering rack are completely obscuring the view. The rear is up on stands, so the front was a bit too low for me to get under and see anything useful, so I'm not sure if it's possible to access the frame pivot bolts from down there, but I don't see how I can even get to them with the steering column and MC in the way.

Am I crazy, or do I really need to move all this stuff to get the z-bar out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,474 Posts
On the frame side is a bracket that holds the other end of the Z bar. It's held on with 2 bolts. I'm thinking a 1/2" socket. Removing this bracket will allow removal of the Z bar after disconnecting the linkage. Removal of the bracket I guess in your case with the booster a d rack is if you can get to it.

When I converted my car from C4 to 4 speed, I made my own linkage with rod ends. It was very easy and cheap to make. The clutch works so much easier and it's been problem free for about 8 years.
758227
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,674 Posts
Yep, you can get under it and reach the 2 bolts that hold the bracket. I have a 67' 289 like you but I have manual steering so I am unfamiliar with how that would factor in. A wrench and lots of patience is needed, you can't see those 2 bolts so everything is by feel.
I also went with the rod ends but I got them from Opentracker, he has the full linkage available at a reasonable cost.
 
  • Like
Reactions: burnout289

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On the frame side is a bracket that holds the other end of the Z bar. It's held on with 2 bolts. I'm thinking a 1/2" socket. Removing this bracket will allow removal of the Z bar after disconnecting the linkage. Removal of the bracket I guess in your case with the booster a d rack is if you can get to it.

When I converted my car from C4 to 4 speed, I made my own linkage with rod ends. It was very easy and cheap to make. The clutch works so much easier and it's been problem free for about 8 years. View attachment 758227
Somewhere I have a similar rod-end setup that a forum member sent me many years ago. It did not seem to work for me at the time, but I should give it another shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yep, you can get under it and reach the 2 bolts that hold the bracket. I have a 67' 289 like you but I have manual steering so I am unfamiliar with how that would factor in. A wrench and lots of patience is needed, you can't see those 2 bolts so everything is by feel.
I also went with the rod ends but I got them from Opentracker, he has the full linkage available at a reasonable cost.
Thanks, that's what I needed to know. Didn't look like there was even room for those bolts to come out with the column right above, but I'll try that.

My car was originally power steer, but I long ago converted it to manual.

I saw ORP's parts, but am in heavy debate about whether I'll stay stock-like or go with a custom pedal swap and hydraulic clutch. If I stay stock, I'll at least do roller pedals. Depends on how many of my existing parts will be reusable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,674 Posts
I have a rollerized pedal assembly and linkage in my 67' and the clutch is as smooth and easy the one in my stock 07' GT.
If you don't have headers, a newer block, or some other obstacle in the way of the factory Z-Bar I don't see any reason why many over complicate things by going to a cable that breaks or a hydraulic system that fails or leaks. The one issue with the factory Z-Bar is, after many years of neglected maintenance and heavy clutches, they will start to "twist" and bend out of shape. There are reinforced Z- bars available or, what I did, was send my stock bar to Opentracker and he straightened it out and welded a reinforcement piece to make it stronger. I have been running it like that for at least a few years with no issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
FWIT, I was able to take out my worn out and bent old stuff and install Opentracker’s complete kit from under the car on jack stands. The car has PS and is a big block so there was less room then in yours.
I also have roller bearing pedals and diaphragm clutch, removed large under dash “assist” spring and it’s really smooth and easy on my 70+ yr old leg, much like the hydraulic factory clutch in my Ranger.
 
  • Like
Reactions: burnout289

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
...I don't see any reason why many over complicate things by going to a cable that breaks or a hydraulic system that fails or leaks...
If I didn't over-complicate things, I'd never get anything done!

Seriously, though, I've also had the lower clutch rod snap on me while driving. And looking at some of the beefed-up z-bar options, those things are not cheap either. This all really depends on how bad my existing parts are and what NEEDS to be replaced to restore smooth functionality. Just knowing that I can remove this from under the car helps a bunch.

I recall a shop helped me out with my worn pedal once by welding a stack of washers on the pedal pivot (I think). It was 15+ years ago, so I don't recall exactly. But there's a chance I may need a new support (if it can't be used for the roller conversion) and possibly a new pedal as well. It sure adds up.

Gotta say, it's really frustrating having the car stored away from home. No matter what I check and take pics of, when I get home I'll think of something I forgot. Then it's another week at least before I can get back there so I search the forums like crazy for info in the meantime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,474 Posts
If I didn't over-complicate things, I'd never get anything done!

Seriously, though, I've also had the lower clutch rod snap on me while driving. And looking at some of the beefed-up z-bar options, those things are not cheap either. This all really depends on how bad my existing parts are and what NEEDS to be replaced to restore smooth functionality. Just knowing that I can remove this from under the car helps a bunch.

I recall a shop helped me out with my worn pedal once by welding a stack of washers on the pedal pivot (I think). It was 15+ years ago, so I don't recall exactly. But there's a chance I may need a new support (if it can't be used for the roller conversion) and possibly a new pedal as well. It sure adds up.

Gotta say, it's really frustrating having the car stored away from home. No matter what I check and take pics of, when I get home I'll think of something I forgot. Then it's another week at least before I can get back there so I search the forums like crazy for info in the meantime.
Oh I can so relate to your last paragraph! I'm out of town during the week and home on weekends.

As far as the pedal hanger being wasted, a Mustang Steve bearing kit would be a great option. Cups are welded on for bearings.
758357
 

·
Registered
1966 Mustang GT 4spd
Joined
·
987 Posts
To get the bolts loosened from up above, use a small block chevy 1/2" distributor wrench. Easy peasy.

Chris
 
  • Like
Reactions: burnout289

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh I can so relate to your last paragraph! I'm out of town during the week and home on weekends.

As far as the pedal hanger being wasted, a Mustang Steve bearing kit would be a great option. Cups are welded on for bearings.
That sounds rough! I'm lucky that I've at least been able to work from home these days...well, required actually. Sure is nice to skip the daily commute (around 65 miles round trip).

I have the Scott Drake bearing kit in my NDP wishlist...is there any notable difference between that and Mustang Steve's? I'm not sure if there are any issues with the support itself that would hinder me from doing this. Now that I think of it, I'll need to remove the MC and booster to get the support out anyway, right? If it ain't one thing, it's three.

Doesn't help that half my welding gear is in my garage and the other half is in the back of the Mustang...space is at an ultra premium right now. Just one more thing that needs to be addressed!
 

·
Registered
1966 Mustang GT 4spd
Joined
·
987 Posts
Thanks for the tip! Is that similar to a crow's foot?
Yes sir! I know they used to make them specifically for that and the curves are perfect for it.

Chris

Something like this:

 
  • Like
Reactions: burnout289

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,474 Posts
Thanks for the tip! Is that similar to a crow's foot?
That sounds rough! I'm lucky that I've at least been able to work from home these days...well, required actually. Sure is nice to skip the daily commute (around 65 miles round trip).

I have the Scott Drake bearing kit in my NDP wishlist...is there any notable difference between that and Mustang Steve's? I'm not sure if there are any issues with the support itself that would hinder me from doing this. Now that I think of it, I'll need to remove the MC and booster to get the support out anyway, right? If it ain't one thing, it's three.

Doesn't help that half my welding gear is in my garage and the other half is in the back of the Mustang...space is at an ultra premium right now. Just one more thing that needs to be addressed!
My job is 150 miles away in a different state, it gets a bit old and frustrating.

In operation I would guess both kits work pretty much the same. The Mustang Steve kit is great for wasted pedal hangers where the shaft hole is elongated or whatever. I suspect the Mustang Steve kit will last well beyond the life of the car or what ever clutch you put in. It's the King Kong version.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top